FDA rejects Singulair-Claritin combination

April 30, 2008

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration rejected a proposed pill that would combine the drugs Claritin and Singular, Schering-Plough said.

The drug, a combination of loratadine and montelukast developed in a joint venture between Schering-Plough and Merck Pharmaceuticals, was targeted for patients with allergic rhinitis symptoms and nasal congestion.

The active ingredients of Claritin is loratadine and the active ingredient of Singulair is montelukast sodium. Both drugs are indicated for the relief of symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis and perennial allergic rhinitis, the two drug companies said in a statement.

The companies did not explain the FDA's reason for rejecting the drug combo.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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