Angiotensin receptor blockers are lower incidence, progression of Alzheimer's disease

July 28, 2008

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have, for the first time, found that angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs)—a particular class of anti-hypertensive medicines—are associated with a striking decrease in the occurrence and progression of dementia. Data from this study will be presented this weekend (July 27) at the 2008 International Conference on Alzheimer's disease in Chicago.

Using data from the Decision Support System Database of the U.S. Department of Health System Veterans Affairs (with information on more than 5 million people), researchers looked at records from patients using ARBs, and compared them with subjects who had a similar health status, but were taking different medications. They found patients taking ARBs had about a 35-40 percent lower chance of getting Alzheimer's disease or dementia.

The researchers also examined patients who were already suffering from Alzheimer's disease or dementia, and found those subjects had up to a 45 percent lower chance of developing delirium, being admitted to nursing homes or dying. Patients who appeared to benefit particularly well from use of ARBs were those who had experienced strokes before or during the course of their illness.

According to the researchers these results suggest that ARBs might protect against developing Alzheimer's disease and dementia. "For those who already have dementia, use of ARBs might delay deterioration of brain function and help keep patients out of nursing homes," said lead presenter Benjamin Wolozin, MD, PhD, a professor of pharmacology at BUSM. "The study is particularly interesting because we compared the effects of ARBs to other medications used for treating blood pressure or cardiovascular disease. This suggests that ARBs are more effective than other blood pressure and cardiovascular medications for preventing Alzheimer's disease or dementia," he added.

Although the researchers are unsure why ARBs might be so beneficial, they believe one possibility suggested by prior studies on animal models is that ARBs help prevent nerve cell injury from blood vessel damage or help promote nerve cell recovery after blood vessel damage. Damage to blood vessels is thought to reduce brain capacity and promote dementia, so reducing this damage might prevent the occurrence or progression of dementia.

Source: Boston University

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holmstar
1 / 5 (1) Jul 28, 2008
or... The other common treatments could be increasing the patients risk of brain disease. Perhaps not quite as likely, but their study doesn't prove their assertion. It only shows a correlation.

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