Researchers One Step Closer to Understanding Underlying Causes of Cancer and Diabetes

March 10, 2010, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency

(PhysOrg.com) -- A Saskatchewan Cancer Agency researcher and her team have discovered a new link between the "on" and "off" switches that control cell growth and insulin responses in the body. This work could have implications for cancer and diabetes treatment.

The p85 protein is known to control the “on switch” for cell division and if it is too active, can result. This “on switch” is also important for cells to respond to and if it is not active enough insulin-insensitive can result.

The new discovery, published this week in the , shows that p85 can also control the “off switch” for these responses.

“By understanding the connection between the switches that control cell responses for growth and insulin we are able to improve our ability to use anti-cancer therapies to target these switches more effectively,” said Deborah Anderson, Senior Research Scientist with the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency and a cross appointment in oncology and biochemistry at the University of Saskatchewan.

Funding for this research originally came from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Regional Partnership Program - Saskatchewan (RPP-SK), with matching funding from the Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation (SHRF).

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Anemia discovery offers new targets to treat fatigue in millions

January 22, 2018
A new discovery from the University of Virginia School of Medicine has revealed an unknown clockwork mechanism within the body that controls the creation of oxygen-carrying red blood cells. The finding sheds light on iron-restricted ...

More surprises about blood development—and a possible lead for making lymphocytes

January 22, 2018
Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have long been regarded as the granddaddy of all blood cells. After we are born, these multipotent cells give rise to all our cell lineages: lymphoid, myeloid and erythroid cells. Hematologists ...

How metal scaffolds enhance the bone healing process

January 22, 2018
A new study shows how mechanically optimized constructs known as titanium-mesh scaffolds can optimize bone regeneration. The induction of bone regeneration is of importance when treating large bone defects. As demonstrated ...

Researchers illustrate how muscle growth inhibitor is activated, could aid in treating ALS

January 19, 2018
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine are part of an international team that has identified how the inactive or latent form of GDF8, a signaling protein also known as myostatin responsible for ...

Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production

January 18, 2018
T cells play a key role in the body's immune response against pathogens. As a new class of therapeutic approaches, T cells are being harnessed to fight cancer, promising more precise, longer-lasting mitigation than traditional, ...

Weight flux alters molecular profile, study finds

January 17, 2018
The human body undergoes dramatic changes during even short periods of weight gain and loss, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.