Care improving, cost saving Indiana Network for Patient Care expands

March 9, 2010

The Indiana Network for Patient Care (INPC), one of the highest volume health information exchanges in the United States, is expanding beyond central Indiana to serve patients from southwestern Indiana and southeastern Illinois.

Good Samaritan Hospital in Vincennes, Ind., joins 40 other medical facilities serving more than 6 million patients as a member of the INPC, a network which makes patient data from one institution securely available at any other INPC participant in real time. This enables physicians to have the information they need - when and where they need it - to make decisions critical to .

Created and operated by the Regenstrief Institute, an international leader in and development and operations, the INPC daily handles approximately 2.5 million secure transactions of clinically relevant data such as laboratory test results, medication and treatment histories, and other clinically important information in a standardized, electronic format. This information is critical to diagnoses, treatment and referral decisions.

Good Samaritan, a 232-bed community health-care facility with 1,600 employees, serves a broard range of patients primarily from southwestern Indiana and southeastern Illinois.

"At Good Samaritan Hospital we understand the importance of having accurate, immediate patient data. This is why we think it's necessary to be a part of the Indiana Network of Patient Care," said Gerald Waldroup, interim president and CEO of Good Samaritan Hospital. "This system takes the burden off the patients, while enabling our physicians to see the most up-to-date and relevant patient information that can have a big impact at the point of care."

Good Samaritan is initially making data from the INPC available in its emergency department where physicians and other health-care providers will now have secure and confidential access to information on patients at the point of care. The hospital will also be able to participate in the State's public health reporting systems and other sophisticated systems designed to improve patient care.

The INPC also supports services including delivering test results and reports to physicians through the DOCS4DOCS® Service and also provides a chronic disease and preventive health service through the Quality Health First® Program, offered by the Indiana Health Information Exchange. IHIE, a Regenstrief partner, is the nation's largest health information exchange.

"Our secure and robust clinical information has the flexibility to provide the kinds of services needed for a particular community," said J. Marc Overhage, M.D., Ph.D., director of medical informatics at the Regenstrief Institute, president and CEO of IHIE and Regenstrief Professor of Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine. "INPC is an easy-to-use, clinical information network that helps physicians give their patients the best care possible while saving healthcare dollars."

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

Team eradicates hepatitis C in 10 patients following lifesaving transplants from infected donors

April 30, 2017
Ten patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease. The findings point to new strategies for increasing ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.