Sun-sensitizing medications, sun exposure associated with common type of cataract

June 14, 2010, JAMA and Archives Journals

The use of medications that increase sensitivity to the sun, combined with exposure to sunlight, appears to be associated with the risk of age-related cataract, according to a report posted online today that will appear in the August print issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.

Besides age, several risk factors have been identified for common types of cataract, including smoking, diabetes and , according to background information in the article. Sunlight and exposure to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) rays have been shown to be associated with cortical cataract, clouding or opacity occurring first on the outer edges of the lenses. Some medications taken by mouth or by injection have been shown to increase sensitivity to the sun, causing signs and symptoms such as itching or rash on areas of the skin exposed to sunlight.

To determine if these medications also affect the association of to cortical cataract, Barbara E. K. Klein, M.D., M.P.H., and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, studied 4,926 individuals living in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin and first examined between 1988 and 1990. Participants were interviewed about their residential history, which was used to construct a measure of their average annual exposure to ambient UV-B rays. Interviewers also asked participants to bring their medications, and any sun-sensitizing drug—including diuretics, , and the pain reliever naproxen sodium.

An increasing percentage of study participants reported having taken these types of medications over a 15-year follow-up period (24.1 percent at the beginning of the study, compared with 44.8 percent at the 15-year follow-up). The overall incidence of cataract was not associated with their use or with exposure to sunlight. However, after adjusting for age and sex, an interaction between sun-sensitizing medication use and UV-B exposure was associated with the development of cortical cataract.

"The medications (active ingredients) represent a broad range of chemical compounds, and the specific mechanism for the interaction is unclear," the authors write. The lens of the eye develops from the same layer of tissue as the skin, and medication that increases the skin's response to the sun may modify the effect of sunlight exposure on the eye as well.

"Our results need to be evaluated in other populations, especially in view of the increasing frequency of sun-sensitizing medications," the authors conclude. "If our findings are confirmed, it would be important to examine whether the effect is greater in those with higher levels of ambient sunlight (UV-B) exposure and if dose or duration of medication use is also important. Because cortical cataract is a common lens opacity in adults, present in about 16 percent of the Beaver Dam Eye Study population at the baseline examination, our study findings may be relevant to public health."

More information: Arch Ophthalmol. 2010;128[8]: doi:10.1001/archophthalmol.2010.138

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

February 21, 2018
Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.

Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors': study

February 21, 2018
Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ...

Tackling health problems in the young is crucial for their children's future

February 21, 2018
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new study by researchers at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, ...

Why teens need up to 10 hours' sleep

February 21, 2018
Technology, other distractions and staying up late make is difficult, but researchers say teenagers need to make time for 8-10 hours of sleep a night to optimise their performance and maintain good health and wellbeing.

Electronic health records don't reduce administrative costs

February 21, 2018
The federal government thought that adopting certified electronic health record systems (EHR) would reduce administrative costs for physicians in a variety of specialties. However, a major new study conducted by researchers ...

Low-fat or low-carb? It's a draw, study finds

February 20, 2018
New evidence from a study at the Stanford University School of Medicine might dismay those who have chosen sides in the low-fat versus low-carb diet debate.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.