Giving birth many times linked to increased risk of heart disease

July 1, 2010, Lancet

Palestinian women frequently give birth many times. This has given researchers in the oPt a unique opportunity to study the effects of numbers of births per woman (parity) on risk of coronary heart disease, since previous studies have lacked high numbers of women giving birth more than six times. In this Abstract, the researchers, led by Dr Najwa Odeh Rizkallah, UNICEF Jerusalem, oPT, conclude that parity is linked to obesity, high blood triglyercide concentrations, and increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Any of these factors, alone or in combination, can in turn increase incidence of coronary heart diseases.

The researchers studies women in the Amaari and Kalandia refugee camps in the oPt. They selected a random sample of 515 of all 587 women aged 40-65 who lived in the camps. Women were told by letter the purpose of the project and invited to take part. 15 women who did not give a blood sample were excluded. The other 500 had the blood fats and sugar measured, and assessments of obesity, diabetes, (hypertension) and were made.

Mean parity of the women enrolled was 7.3 births. More than two thirds (69%) of the women were obese, 84% had central obesity (waist circumference greater or equal to 88 cm), and over half (52%)had abdominal obesity (high waist-to-hip ratio). One in five women (22%) had diabetes, while two in five (43%) had hypertension. Following data adjustment for age and other factors, each additional birth increased body-mass index by 0.3kg/m2, by 0.58cm, and blood triglyceride concentrations by 0.036mmol/L. Women found to have metabolic syndrome (58%) had much higher parity than those without.

The authors conclude: "In Palestinian women, high parity was significantly associated with , triglyceride concentration, and increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Any of these risk factors, alone or in combination, could result in increased incidence of . Future studies should investigate the effect of birth spacing and intervals."

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production

January 18, 2018
T cells play a key role in the body's immune response against pathogens. As a new class of therapeutic approaches, T cells are being harnessed to fight cancer, promising more precise, longer-lasting mitigation than traditional, ...

Weight flux alters molecular profile, study finds

January 17, 2018
The human body undergoes dramatic changes during even short periods of weight gain and loss, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Secrets of longevity protein revealed in new study

January 17, 2018
Named after the Greek goddess who spun the thread of life, Klotho proteins play an important role in the regulation of longevity and metabolism. In a recent Yale-led study, researchers revealed the three-dimensional structure ...

The HLF gene protects blood stem cells by maintaining them in a resting state

January 17, 2018
The HLF gene is necessary for maintaining blood stem cells in a resting state, which is crucial for ensuring normal blood production. This has been shown by a new research study from Lund University in Sweden published in ...

Magnetically applied MicroRNAs could one day help relieve constipation

January 17, 2018
Constipation is an underestimated and debilitating medical issue related to the opioid epidemic. As a growing concern, researchers look to new tools to help patients with this side effect of opioid use and aging.

Researchers devise decoy molecule to block pain where it starts

January 16, 2018
For anyone who has accidentally injured themselves, Dr. Zachary Campbell not only sympathizes, he's developing new ways to blunt pain.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.