High-risk prostate cancer associated with significantly lower bone mineral content loss

July 13, 2010, Wiley

Men with prostate cancer lose significantly less bone mineral content (BMC) as they age than men who are free of the disease, according to research in the July issue of BJUI. The findings are important because loss of BMC can play a key role in the development of fragile bones, fractures and osteoporosis.

American researchers studied 519 participants who joined the Baltimore at an average age of 56 between 1973 and 1984. The maximum follow-up was 35 years and the median was 22 years. Seventy-six men who took part in the study were later diagnosed with prostate cancer, with just under a quarter (24 per cent) falling into the high-risk category.

When they charted the individual BMCs of the study subjects over an extended period, the researchers could clearly see that the decline was much larger in healthy men than in men later diagnosed with prostate cancer, especially those with high-risk prostate cancer. This occurred despite the fact that the initial baseline readings were very similar for all three groups.

The researchers also adjusted the figures to take account of other factors that affect BMC, such as smoking status, , and vitamin D. However, this did not change the significant differences between the healthy men and those with prostate cancer.

"There are numerous possible mechanisms to explain the relationship between prostate cancer and BMC" says lead author Dr Stacy Loeb, from Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, USA.

"It is well known that prostate cancer frequently metastasizes (spreads) to bone. Although the biology underlying the association between BMC and this form of cancer requires additional research, our findings suggest that common growth factors might be involved in both bone maintenance and the progression of prostate cancer.

"We believe that this may be why the patients with the highest risk prostate cancer also demonstrated the least loss of BMC as they got older, when compared with patients with non high-risk prostate cancer and no prostate cancer."

The baseline demographics between the three groups of men were similar when it came to their body mass index and smoking history.

The authors believe that this is the first study to explore the relationship between longitudinal BMC measurement and the long-term risk of prostate cancer and, more specifically, life-threatening disease. They point out that the study sample was primarily white (96 per cent) and, due to racial differences in bone density, may not be generally applicable to other ethnic groups.

"We would like to see our theories tested further in larger populations of men at risk of developing life-threatening prostate cancer" concludes Dr Loeb. "If we can better understand the link between and bone, it may help us to find ways of preventing the spread of this disease to bone in the future."

More information: Bone mineral content and prostate cancer risk: data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Loeb et al. BJUI. 106, pp 28-31. (July 2010). DOI: 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2009.09109.x

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Study tracks evolutionary transition to destructive cancer

February 23, 2018
Evolution describes how all living forms cope with challenges in their environment, as they struggle to persevere against formidable odds. Mutation and selective pressure—cornerstones of Darwin's theory—are the means ...

Researchers use a molecular Trojan horse to deliver chemotherapeutic drug to cancer cells

February 23, 2018
A research team at the University of California, Riverside has discovered a way for chemotherapy drug paclitaxel to target migrating, or circulating, cancer cells, which are responsible for the development of tumor metastases.

Lab-grown 'mini tumours' could personalise cancer treatment

February 23, 2018
Testing cancer drugs on miniature replicas of a patient's tumour could help doctors tailor treatment, according to new research.

An under-the-radar immune cell shows potential in fight against cancer

February 23, 2018
One of the rarest of immune cells, unknown to scientists a decade ago, might prove to be a potent weapon in stopping cancer from spreading in the body, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

Putting black skin cancer to sleep—for good

February 22, 2018
An international research team has succeeded in stopping the growth of malignant melanoma by reactivating a protective mechanism that prevents tumor cells from dividing. The team used chemical agents to block the enzymes ...

Cancer risk associated with key epigenetic changes occurring through normal aging process

February 22, 2018
Some scientists have hypothesized that tumor-promoting changes in cells during cancer development—particularly an epigenetic change involving DNA methylation—arise from rogue cells escaping a natural cell deterioration ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.