Resveratrol Linked to Positive Impact on Pre-diabetes

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have linked resveratrol, a chemical compound found in red wine, to improved health of patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), also known as “pre-diabetes.”

The results of the small pilot study presented at the annual meeting of the American Association (ADA) earlier this month showed promise. Among 10 patients with IGT given resveratrol supplements at concentrations higher than those normally found in wine, grapes or peanuts, all demonstrated lower post-meal and improved insulin sensitivity - an encouraging outcome with potential implications for those with type 2 diabetes or at high risk for the condition. The study was led by Jill Crandall, M.D., associate professor of clinical medicine and director of the Diabetes Clinical Trials Unit at Einstein.

“The results of this pilot study are preliminary and need to be confirmed in larger numbers of patients,” said Dr. Crandall. “However, we are encouraged by these findings and plan to conduct additional studies to further explore the potential utility of resveratrol in improving ."

Also presented at the meeting was a related study by Meredith Hawkins, M.D., professor of medicine and director of the Global Diabetes Initiative at Einstein. She reported on the effect of resveratrol in overweight, middle-aged subjects who were insulin resistant. Using a highly sensitive measurement technique, Dr. Hawkins detected a 40 percent increase in , as well as improvements in mitochondrial function. An unrelated, non-Einstein resveratrol study presented at the ADA meeting showed the substance may prevent harmful blood vessel growth in the retina of mice.


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