CDC: Asthma rate in US up a little to 8.2 pct

January 12, 2011 By MIKE STOBBE , AP Medical Writer

(AP) -- Asthma seems to be increasing a little, and nearly one in 12 Americans now say they have the respiratory disease, federal health officials said Wednesday

About 8.2 percent of Americans had in a 2009 national survey of about 40,000 individuals. That's nearly 25 million people with asthma, according to a report.

The rate had been holding steady at a little under 8 percent for the previous four years.

Better diagnostic efforts could be part of the reason for the increase. They were believed to be a main reason for an increase in asthma seen from 1980 through 1995, said Dr. Lara Akinbami, a medical officer at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.

Asthma is a chronic disease involving attacks of impaired breathing. Symptoms may include coughing, wheezing, and . It can be fatal: Health officials estimate more than 3,000 U.S. asthma deaths occur each year.

But treatment seems to be improving, with 52 percent of asthma patients in the 2009 survey saying they suffered an attack in the previous year, down from 60 percent at the beginning of the decade.

Asthma is more common among women than men. It's also more common in children, blacks, Puerto Ricans, people living below the poverty level, and people in the Northeast and Midwest, according to the CDC.

More information: CDC report: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs

shares

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Portable 3-D scanner assesses patients with elephantiasis

October 17, 2017
An estimated 120 million people worldwide are infected with lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic, mosquito-borne disease that can cause major swelling and deformity of the legs, a condition known as elephantiasis. Health-care ...

New tools to combat kidney fibrosis

October 16, 2017
Interstitial fibrosis – excessive tissue scarring – contributes to chronic kidney disease, which is increasing in prevalence in the United States.

How hepatitis C hides in the body

October 13, 2017
The Hepatitis C (HCV) virus is a sly enemy to have in one's body. Not only does it manage to make itself invisible to the immune system by breaking down communication between the immune cells, it also builds secret virus ...

Largest study yet of malaria in Africa shows historical rates of infection

October 12, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers with members from the Kenya Medical Research Institute, the University of Oxford and the University of KwaZulu-Natal has conducted the largest-ever study of the history of malaria ...

Promising new target for treatment of psoriasis is safe, study shows

October 11, 2017
A protein known to play a significant role in the development of psoriasis can be prevented from functioning without posing a risk to patients, scientists at King's College London have found.

Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells

October 11, 2017
Noroviruses are the leading cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis in the world and are estimated to cause 267 million infections and 20,000 deaths each year. This virus causes severe diarrhea, nausea, and stomach pain.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

geokstr
1 / 5 (1) Jan 12, 2011
Better diagnostic efforts could be part of the reason for the increase.

I wonder how much is due to the "hypochondria effect" (TM), where now that it's all over the news, a marginal number of people think "Oh noes! That must be what I have". Or how much is due to the inevitable broadening of what can be called "asthma", as happened with autism, and the thoroughly phony ADD/ADHD? We'll call that one the "bandwagon effect" (TM).

Or how much is due to the "shyster effect" (TM), in effect - somebody has something wrong with them, and we have to find somebody else with really deep pockets and make them PAY. (With a piddling 60% to ourselves for our efforts to help these poor suffering b*st*rds.)

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.