A diabetes drug, sitagliptin, also has a potential to prevent diabetes

March 24, 2011

Diabetes type 2 is caused by insufficient levels of insulin to keep blood glucose under control. Excessive levels of another hormone, glucagon, can also contribute to diabetes type 2 by causing the liver to flood the body with stored glucose. Diabetes type 2 does not arise overnight, but slowly progresses for many years as a condition known as prediabetes. In prediabetes, blood sugar rises to excessive levels after a meal, but is normal or nearly normal after an overnight fast. Researchers are seeking ways to prevent prediabetes from progressing to diabetes. Besides diet and exercise, the diabetic drug metformin can slow the onset of diabetes.

In the March 2011 issue of Experimental Biology and Medicine researchers in the Department of Nutrition at Case Western Reserve University determined whether a newer diabetes drug, sitagliptin, might be effective in prediabetes. Sitagliptin works by boosting the levels of an intestinal factor known as GLP-1. This factor increases insulin output while also decreasing glucagon output. They used an with prediabetes, the SHROB rat, which was developed at Case Western Reserve University beginning in the 1970's. These rats are extremely obese and have normal glucose after fasting but high glucose after a meal, like prediabetic humans. Also like prediabetic humans, they have excessive levels of glucagon.

The prediabetic rats were divided into three groups and treated with either a placebo, sitagliptin, or another older diabetes medication, glyburide, which acts by boosting the production of insulin by the pancreas. Sitagliptin and glyburide were equally effective in lowering after a meal. Surprisingly, only sitagliptin raised the total output of insulin by the pancreas and only sitagliptin lowered glucagon to normal levels.

Neither of the diabetes medications had any effect on body weight, total body fat or . This matches studies in humans, which show no loss or gain of weight from these drugs. But differences appeared when the distribution of body fat was examined. Compared to the older drug glyburide, sitagliptin caused a redistribution of body fat from the abdominal fat deposits to deposits under the skin. Lowering the proportion of fat stored within the abdomen has a number of favorable effects in diabetes and for cardiovascular risk factors. This is the first time that sitagliptin has been found to affect fat distribution, and the cellular basis for this change is an open question.

Group leader Paul Ernsberger, Ph.D., says, "These animal studies suggest that sitagliptin should be tested in the clinic as a possible diabetes-preventing medication. It may act to shore up the function of the pancreas, which deteriorates during the onset of diabetes." Co-investigator Richard J. Koletsky, M.D. says "Sitagliptin's effects on enhancing post prandial insulin secretion and decreasing glucagon secretion offer new pharmacologic interventions to combat diabetes and potentially delay and even prevent its onset."

Steven R. Goodman, Editor-in-Chief of Experimental Biology and Medicine, said "this animal model study by Ernsberger and colleagues suggests that sitagliptin can slow the onset of . Of great interest is the finding that this drug can redistribute body fat from the abdomen to deposits under the skin."

More information: ebm.rsmjournals.com/

Related Stories

Recommended for you

With no morphine, 25 million die in pain each year: report

October 13, 2017
Every year, some 25 million people—one in ten of them children—die in serious pain that could have been alleviated with morphine at just a few cents per dose, researchers said Friday.

Study finds few restrictions on Rx opioids through Medicare

October 9, 2017
Medicare plans place few restrictions on the coverage of prescription opioids, despite federal guidelines recommending such restrictions, a new Yale study finds. The research results highlight an untapped opportunity for ...

Nocebo effect: Does a drug's high price tag cause its own side effects?

October 5, 2017
Pricey drugs may make people more vulnerable to perceiving side effects, a new study suggests—and the phenomenon is not just "in their heads."

Pre-packaged brand version of compounded medication to prevent preterm births costs 5,000 percent more

October 2, 2017
Preventing a preterm birth could cost as little as $200 or as much as $20,000, depending on which one of two medications a doctor orders, according to a new analysis from Harvard Medical School.

Cancer drugs' high prices not justified by cost of development, study contends

September 12, 2017
(HealthDay)— Excusing the sky-high price tags of many new cancer treatments, pharmaceutical companies often blame high research and development (R&D) costs.

Non-psychotropic cannabinoids show promise for pain relief

September 4, 2017
Some cancers love bone. They thrive in its nutrient-rich environment while gnawing away at the very substrate that sustains them, all the while releasing inflammatory substances that cause pain—pain so severe that opioids ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.