Study finds international variations in quality of life loss after fracture

March 24, 2011, International Osteoporosis Foundation

A study presented today at the European Congress on Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis currently taking place in Valencia, Spain has found that the initial quality of life loss following an osteoporotic fracture is substantial, especially with regard to hip and vertebral fractures. The study found differences in quality of life loss between countries after correcting for other explanatory variables.

The (QoL) of patients who sustained a hip, wrist or vertebral fracture was examined for the four months following the fracture. The study is part of the International Costs and Utilities Related to Osteoporotic Fractures Study (ICUROS) which is an international patient-based study endorsed by the International Osteoporosis Foundation. ICUROS investigates the costs and of osteoporotic fractures in women and men over the age of fifty. The aim is to gather better information regarding the burden of in the participating countries and worldwide. Currently, eleven countries are involved in ICUROS.

Involving 2,737 patients from nine countries, the study found that quality of life loss over four months was highest for hip fractures, followed by vertebral and wrist fractures. Interestingly, significant variations between countries were identified. Quality of life loss after hip fracture was greatest in Lithuania, followed by Italy, Russia and Mexico. Lower quality of life loss was experienced by hip fracture patients in Austria and Sweden. In all countries in which vertebral fractures were studied, patients who were hospitalized experienced more quality of life loss than those who were not hospitalized following vertebral fracture.

More information: The abstract 'Quality of life four months following a fracture – results from the ICUROS', F. Borgström, et al. (OC14) is published in supplement issue of Osteoporosis International. DOI 10.1007/s00198-011-1554-9

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