Psychiatrist discusses dangers of 'E-personality' in latest podcast

March 9, 2011, Stanford University Medical Center

(PhysOrg.com) -- Psychiatrist Elias Aboujaoude, MD, discusses the Internet's psychological impact and how our online traits are unconsciously being imported into our offline lives in this podcast.

In this podcast, Stanford psychiatrist Elias Aboujaoude, MD, discusses his new book, Virtually You: The Dangerous Powers of the E-Personality, which explores how our online traits are unconsciously being imported into our offline lives. Drawing from his clinical work and personal experience, he shows how excessive use of the Internet, cell phones and other technologies can cause us to become more impatient, impulsive, forgetful and narcissistic. Length: 32 min.

How much of your life is consumed online? In the latest podcast in the Stanford University School of Medicine’s “1:2:1” series, Elias Aboujaoude, MD, discusses the Internet's and how our online traits are unconsciously being imported into our offline lives.

Aboujaoude, clinical associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and director of Stanford’s impulse control and obsessive-compulsive disorder clinics, has written a new book, Virtually You: The Dangerous Powers of the E-Personality. Drawing from his clinical work and personal experience, he shows how excessive use of the Internet, cell phones and other technologies can cause us to become more impatient, impulsive, forgetful and narcissistic.

More information: To become a regular subscriber of “1:2:1,” a series of conversations about advances in health-care policy and biomedical research, visit iTunes at: itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZ … lection?id=385763110

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RMW
not rated yet Mar 09, 2011
I worry that a person with a formidable background in science such as the author cum interviewee claims that the rate of (online) page-change might be causing youth and children to develop attention disorders. Is it not possible that visual attention in humans has developed in order to handle information that changes just as rapidly in the environment? For instance, think of running, dodging or jumping over obstacles, following an internal 'map' and udpating that 'map' in order to reach one's destination (on foot).

I question the author's responsibility in offering his view: as a person trained in thinking carefully, would it have hurt him to omit the ADD-internet causal claim?

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