Holy $#!! Swearing can actually help you, study says

April 21, 2011 By Amina Khan

You know how you yell and curse and say bad things when you drop a hammer on your foot or burn your hand on a stove?

No need to feel bad about it, says a 2-year-old study from the journal NeuroReport that's been making the rounds this week. Swearing actually helps reduce the pain you feel.

Researchers from Keele University in Staffordshire, England, asked test subjects to put their hands in icy cold water, and see how long they could stand to keep them immersed. (This is a common practice to test pain, because it leaves no mark and does no physiological harm.)

They then had the study participants either say a swear word or a neutral word. They found that those who invoked foul language were able to withstand the pain better than those who kept it clean.

The researchers think that swearing induces a flight-or-fight response, and thus, "nullifies the link between fear of and ."

This doesn't mean you should let loose indiscriminately, though. The effect worked best for people who did not swear often.

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3 comments

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dan42day
not rated yet Apr 21, 2011
Mythbusters showed this years ago.
RobertKarlStonjek
1 / 5 (1) Apr 23, 2011
To induce spontaneous foul utterances, try lowering the genitals into the icy cold water...
6_6
not rated yet Apr 25, 2011
My opinion differs strongly to that of the study

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