Self-control key to happier life

April 15, 2011, Massey University

(PhysOrg.com) -- New Zealand’s first symposium exploring how self-control in young children leads to better outcomes in later life is being hosted at the Wellington campus by Massey University’s School of Public Health on Monday. It is being held in association with the National Centre for Lifecourse Research and the University of Otago.

Head of School Associate Professor Cindy Kiro, a former Children’s Commissioner, says the symposium would bring together some of the most prominent scientists, health researchers, community providers and policy makers in New Zealand.

“Making sure that science informs policy and that we listen to communities is important when, as a country, we are creating significant policies like Whanau Ora and those for health, economic development and addressing the prevention of crime,” Dr. Kiro says.

It is a stance supported by fellow symposium keynote speaker, National Center for Lifecourse Research co-director Professor Richie Poulton. He leads the Dunedin Longitudinal study, which has studied the social and physical development of a group of 1000 people from their birth in 1972-73, to the age of 32.

“If we can do the right things to promote among children when they are young, we will significantly improve their chances of economic wellbeing, good health and lower participation in crime when they are adults,” Professor Poulton says.

His co-director at the centre, Professor Terrie Moffitt, of Duke University, King’s College London is the other keynote speaker.

A roundtable debate featuring politicians and policymakers will also be held. Participants include Disability Issues Minister Tariana Turia, who is also Associate Minister of Social Development and Associate Minister of Health, Labour Party social policy spokeswoman and deputy leader Annette King, Green Party co-leader Metiria Turei, and the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor Professor Sir Peter Gluckman.

Dr. Kiro says the news has been full of stories recently about out-of-control teens. “But we know there are things we can do that will help our young people learn control and have better long-term outcomes in later life,” she says. “What we want to do at this symposium is to look at the entire package of factors affecting children, including poverty, health living conditions and stress as well as self-control and make sure we’re doing the best we can for our young to make sure they get the best out of life later on.”

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds

January 19, 2018
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.