Transcatheter aortic valve implantation as good as traditional surgery for high risk, operable patients

April 5, 2011
TAVI as good as traditional surgery for high risk, operable patients
The valve used in TAVI surgery.

Just released data from a clinical trial shows continued promise for a new minimally invasive treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. New research presented at the 2011 American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions from the first arm, Cohort A, of the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNER) Trial shows that transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is as good as traditional open heart surgery for high-risk, but operable patients. The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) is a participating site for the trial.

Speaking at the meeting as part of the panel presenting the data, Howard C. Herrmann, MD, director of the Interventional Cardiology and Cardiac Catheterization Laboratories at Penn, said “The results are a win-win for patients. Surgery was better than expected and TAVI was even better at 30 days and as good as surgery at one year. High risk patients with this common life threatening disease will likely soon have a less invasive alternative to . I anticipate that the results of TAVI will only get better with experience and further improvements in the technology.”

Cohort A compared outcomes after treatment with either the TAVI procedure or traditional open-heart surgery in 699 high-risk, operable patients. The study is a "non-inferiority" trial designed to evaluate whether patient outcomes after transcatheter replacement are comparable to surgical outcomes in these patients.

Researchers at the meeting cautioned that although the study met its primary endpoint of demonstrating non-inferiority to traditional surgery, major strokes and other vascular complications were higher in the TAVI-treated patients, both at 30 days and one year. By contrast, major bleeding was more than twice as common in the surgical group.

The PARTNER Trial is a randomized, controlled pivotal trial of a transcatheter aortic heart valve – a collapsible and balloon-expandable valve that can be introduced into the body via a catheter-based delivery system. The valve replaces a patient’s diseased valve without traditional open-heart surgery and while the patient’s heart continues to beat. The trial is studying the valve in both operable (Cohort A) and inoperable (Cohort B) patients with severe aortic stenosis.

Previous results from the trial indicated that this therapeutic option was viable for patients too sick to undergo traditional open-heart surgery (Cohort B). As compared to standard medical therapy, the new procedure, transcatheter aortic valve implantation significantly reduced mortality rates in the patients who received the new valve.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

Team eradicates hepatitis C in 10 patients following lifesaving transplants from infected donors

April 30, 2017
Ten patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease. The findings point to new strategies for increasing ...

'bench to bedside to bench': Scientists call for closer basic-clinical collaborations

March 24, 2017
In the era of genome sequencing, it's time to update the old "bench-to-bedside" shorthand for how basic research discoveries inform clinical practice, researchers from The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), National Human Genome Research ...

The ethics of tracking athletes' biometric data

January 18, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—Whether it is a FitBit or a heart rate monitor, biometric technologies have become household devices. Professional sports leagues use some of the most technologically advanced biodata tracking systems to ...

Financial ties between researchers and drug industry linked to positive trial results

January 18, 2017
Financial ties between researchers and companies that make the drugs they are studying are independently associated with positive trial results, suggesting bias in the evidence base, concludes a study published by The BMJ ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.