UK health regulators apply brakes to 'three-parent' IVF procedure

April 20, 2011 by Bob Yirka, Medical Xpress report

(PhysOrg.com) -- In what is rapidly turning into a political debate in the United Kingdom, members of the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA) have, after careful review, declined to allow legislation to be introduced that would allow what has become known as three-parent in vitro fertilization, to become legal.

While technically it’s two different kinds of techniques, the result is the same, faulty mitochondrial DNA material from the mother is replaced with donor material from another woman, resulting in a very tiny amount of the third person’s DNA becoming a part of the embryo, and eventual human being.

Parent’s rights groups, medical researchers and others have pushed for the procedures (which have been pioneered in Britain) to become legal as soon as possible citing the devastating effects of mitochondrial maladies on newborn babies; with ailments ranging from muscular and learning disorders to diabetes, blindness or organ failure.

The HFEA, the agency responsible for regulating fertility treatment in the UK, in its findings, suggested that more research is needed before allowing the procedure to be used by the general public. The fear of course, is that the procedure could cause some as yet unknown side effects such as different types of genetic disorders. Thus far, the procedure has been shown to produce viable embryos in humans, but nothing beyond that has been tested due to it being illegal to implant such an embryo into a human uterus.

The first type of procedure is called maternal spindle transfer, and involves removing the nucleus from a donor egg, then swapping in the nucleic material from the would-be mother’s egg and then fertilizing it.

The second type of procedure, called pro-nuclear transfer, involves fertilizing both a mother and donor egg, then removing the major DNA material from the donor egg and replacing it with DNA material from the mother-to-be’s egg; followed by implantation in a uterus.
The second technique irks right-to-life advocates because it involves the destruction of a fertilized embryo.

As the debate grows, it appears more and more groups become involved, with some complaining that IVF itself is immoral because all it does is add more children to an already overpopulated planet; others worry about parental rights issues if a child were to be born with DNA from three people, while others yet worry about immigration issues if the three people involved are not from the same country. Others still claim that this is just another step towards cloning human beings due to the process involved being almost identical to actual cloning procedures.

In any event, it appears that unless some surprising new development occurs that shows the procedures to be unsafe as further research is conducted, they will likely at some point be made legal, at least in Britain.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Researchers illustrate how muscle growth inhibitor is activated, could aid in treating ALS

January 19, 2018
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine are part of an international team that has identified how the inactive or latent form of GDF8, a signaling protein also known as myostatin responsible for ...

Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production

January 18, 2018
T cells play a key role in the body's immune response against pathogens. As a new class of therapeutic approaches, T cells are being harnessed to fight cancer, promising more precise, longer-lasting mitigation than traditional, ...

Weight flux alters molecular profile, study finds

January 17, 2018
The human body undergoes dramatic changes during even short periods of weight gain and loss, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Secrets of longevity protein revealed in new study

January 17, 2018
Named after the Greek goddess who spun the thread of life, Klotho proteins play an important role in the regulation of longevity and metabolism. In a recent Yale-led study, researchers revealed the three-dimensional structure ...

The HLF gene protects blood stem cells by maintaining them in a resting state

January 17, 2018
The HLF gene is necessary for maintaining blood stem cells in a resting state, which is crucial for ensuring normal blood production. This has been shown by a new research study from Lund University in Sweden published in ...

Magnetically applied MicroRNAs could one day help relieve constipation

January 17, 2018
Constipation is an underestimated and debilitating medical issue related to the opioid epidemic. As a growing concern, researchers look to new tools to help patients with this side effect of opioid use and aging.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.