First human NOTES experience for sleeve gastrectomy at UCSD

May 9, 2011

Sleeve gastrectomy, in which part of the stomach is removed, can be safe and effective when performed either transorally or transvaginally, according to researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) who are pioneering the surgery in the U.S.

Natural orifice translumenal ® (NOTES) eliminates the need for a large incision for organ removal, which could increase risks for infection, incisional hernia and other problems. In their review of 14 morbidly obese patients who had undergone NOTES as part of a gastrectomy, the researchers found no complications. Hospital stays averaged two days.

"In experienced hands, this is a viable option for the popular laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy," said Garth Jacobsen, MD, director of clinical operations at the UCSD center for the future of surgery.

Noted Sheetal Nijhawan, MD, of the UCSD department of surgery, "The procedure is further evidence that it is possible to safely remove sizable organs from the abdominal cavity in both men and women without leaving large scars on the abdominal wall."

Patients involved in the multi-year study included 12 women and two men whose pre-operative body mass index was 46.1. Nearly three-quarters had high blood pressure and 42 percent had diabetes, osteoarthritis or high cholesterol.

Researchers are now moving toward a purely NOTES protocol for morbid obesity, with the knowledge gleaned from their surgical experience applicable to other operations, Dr. Nijhawan said.

More information: Dr. Nijhawan will present these data on Monday, May 9 at 1:00 p.m. CT in Arie Crown Theater, McCormick Place.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

Team eradicates hepatitis C in 10 patients following lifesaving transplants from infected donors

April 30, 2017
Ten patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease. The findings point to new strategies for increasing ...

'bench to bedside to bench': Scientists call for closer basic-clinical collaborations

March 24, 2017
In the era of genome sequencing, it's time to update the old "bench-to-bedside" shorthand for how basic research discoveries inform clinical practice, researchers from The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), National Human Genome Research ...

The ethics of tracking athletes' biometric data

January 18, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—Whether it is a FitBit or a heart rate monitor, biometric technologies have become household devices. Professional sports leagues use some of the most technologically advanced biodata tracking systems to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.