Cancer risk evaluation: Methods and trends

July 14, 2011

The development of almost all cancer is influenced by environmental factors, argues Dr Günter Obe and co-editors in their new title Cancer Risk Evaluation: Methods and Trends. However, while some environmental factors, such as smoking or ionizing radiation, puts the vast majority of humans at risk regardless of their genetic background, many other risk factors such as hazardous working conditions, increase the cancer risk for smaller groups of the population and are often dependent on additional factors as well as an individual's genetics.

Cancer Risk Evaluation looks at how scientists and medical practitioners can accurately assess the risk of potentially carcinogenic factors, a task which remains a great challenge due to the time lag between exposure and effect, as well as the great variation of susceptibility between individuals.

The authors explore the context of risk assessment, highlighting various aspects of risk management. Written by leading experts from across the globe, this is a resource for policy makers and professionals in health risk assessment, and public health workers, as well as oncologists and researchers in academia.

Cancer Risk Evaluation provides an overview of the different approaches to cancer assessment of and discusses strengths and weaknesses of each method, including a major focus on the use of different -omics techniques.

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