Early research shows dietary supplement may lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes

September 22, 2011, University of California - Los Angeles

UCLA researchers demonstrated that an over-the-counter dietary supplement may help inhibit development of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, conditions that are involved in the development of Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which affect millions worldwide.

In this early preclinical study, a naturally produced amino acid-like molecule called GABA was given orally to mice that were obese, insulin resistant and in the early stages of Type 2 diabetes. Researchers found that GABA suppressed the inflammatory immune responses that are involved in the development of this condition.

According to study authors, GABA helped prevent disease progression and improved and insulin sensitivity, even after onset of Type 2 diabetes in mice. Researchers also identified the regulatory immune cells that likely direct GABA's activity in inhibiting inflammation.

Explore further: Study shows loss of key estrogen regulator may lead to metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis

More information: The research appears in the Sept. 22 online edition of the peer-reviewed journal, PLoS One.

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