IADR/AADR publish study on obesity link to periodontitis

October 31, 2011

In a study titled "MicroRNA Modulation in Obesity and Periodontitis," lead author Romina Perri, University of North Carolina School of Dentistry, Oral Health Institute, conducted a pilot investigation to determine whether obesity or periodontal disease modified microRNA expression and whether there was any potential interaction between obesity and periodontitis that could involve microRNA modulation. This study is published in the Journal of Dental Research, the official publication of the International and American Associations for Dental Research (IADR/AADR).

In this investigation, total RNA was extracted from gingival biopsy samples collected from 20 patients in 4 groups (5 non-obese [BMI < 30kg/m2] participants with a healthy periodontium, 5 non-obese participants with periodontitis, 5 obese [BMI > 30kg/m2] participants with a healthy periodontium and 5 obese participants with periodontitis).

Two microRNA species (miR-18a,miR-30e) were up-regulated among with a healthy periodontium. Two microRNA species (miR-30e,miR-106b) were up-regulated in non-obese subjects with periodontal disease and in the presence of and obesity, nine microRNAs were significantly up-regulated (miR-15a,miR-18a,miR-22,miR-30d,miR-30e,miR-103,miR-106b, miR-130a,miR-142-3p,miR-185 and miR-210). The authors conclude that the data are consistent with the concept that miRNA that are induced by chronic nutritional stress leading to obesity may also non-parsimoniously modulate inflammatory pathways within periodontal tissues and affect disease expression.

"The expression of specific microRNA species in obesity provides new insight into possible mechanisms of how risk factors might modify periodontal inflammation and may represent novel therapeutic targets," said JDR Editor-in-Chief William Giannobile.

A perspective article titled "Obesity, Inflammation and : are microRNAs the Missing Link?" was co-authored by Francesco D'Aiuto and Jean Suvan, University College London Eastman Dental Institute. In it, the authors suggest that these data could represent a mechanistic breakthrough in our understanding of the modulatory effects of obesity on periodontal tissue destruction, but caution reproducibility of these findings is needed in larger and well-characterized cohorts.

Explore further: Novel therapeutic target identified to decrease triglycerides and increase 'good' cholesterol

More information: jdr.sagepub.com/content/early/recent

Related Stories

Novel therapeutic target identified to decrease triglycerides and increase 'good' cholesterol

October 20, 2011
Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center today announce findings published in the October 20 issue of Nature that show for the first time the inhibition of both microRNA-33a and microRNA-33b (miR-33a/b) with chemically modified ...

Recommended for you

Expert: Be concerned about how apps collect, share health data

October 20, 2017
As of 2016 there were more than 165,000 health and wellness apps available though the Apple App Store alone. According to Rice University medical media expert Kirsten Ostherr, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates ...

Three million Americans carry loaded handguns daily, study finds

October 19, 2017
An estimated 3 million adult American handgun owners carry a firearm loaded and on their person on a daily basis, and 9 million do so on a monthly basis, new research indicates. The vast majority cited protection as their ...

More teens than ever aren't getting enough sleep

October 19, 2017
If you're a young person who can't seem to get enough sleep, you're not alone: A new study led by San Diego State University Professor of Psychology Jean Twenge finds that adolescents today are sleeping fewer hours per night ...

Across Asia, liver cancer is linked to herbal remedies: study

October 18, 2017
Researchers have uncovered widespread evidence of a link between traditional Chinese herbal remedies and liver cancer across Asia, a study said Wednesday.

Eating better throughout adult years improves physical fitness in old age, suggests study

October 18, 2017
People who have a healthier diet throughout their adult lives are more likely to be stronger and fitter in older age than those who don't, according to a new study led by the University of Southampton.

Global calcium consumption appears low, especially in Asia

October 18, 2017
Daily calcium intake among adults appears to vary quite widely around the world in distinct regional patterns, according to a new systematic review of research data ahead of World Osteoporosis Day on Friday, Oct. 20.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.