Medications

Regenerative drug restores bone in preclinical study

Bone loss is a part of aging that compromises quality of life and movement in many older people, but regenerative treatments to improve their health and well-being have been limited. Now, a study led by Lankenau Institute ...

Medical research

Understanding oral bacteria to help fight periodontal disease

Using the extremely brilliant light of the Canadian Light Source at the University of Saskatchewan, researchers from Wilfrid Laurier University have advanced our understanding of how a specific group of bacteria in the human ...

Dentistry

New device for early detection of gum disease

Researchers from the University of Birmingham are developing a rapid test for gum disease, and they expect the technology—a probe for use in point of care settings such as dental surgeries or pharmacies—to play a pivotal ...

Dentistry

Gel treats gum disease by fighting inflammation

A topical gel that blocks the receptor for a metabolic byproduct called succinate treats gum disease by suppressing inflammation and changing the makeup of bacteria in the mouth, according to a new study led by researchers ...

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Periodontitis

Periodontitis (peri = around, odont = tooth, -itis = inflammation) refers to a number of inflammatory diseases affecting the periodontium — that is, the tissues that surround and support the teeth. Periodontitis involves progressive loss of the alveolar bone around the teeth, and if left untreated, can lead to the loosening and subsequent loss of teeth. Periodontitis is caused by bacteria that adhere to and grow on the tooth's surfaces, along with an overly aggressive immune response against these bacteria. A diagnosis of periodontitis is established by inspecting the soft gum tissues around the teeth with a probe and radiographs by visual analysis, to determine the amount of bone loss around the teeth. Specialists in the treatment of periodontitis are periodontists; their field is known as "periodontology" and "periodontics".

Chronic Periodontitis, the most common form of the disease, progresses relatively slowly and typically becomes clinically evident in adulthood. Aggressive Periodontitis is a rarer form, but as its name implies, progresses more rapidly and becomes clinically evident in adolescence. Although the different forms of periodontitis are all caused by bacterial infections, a variety of factors affect the severity of the disease. Important "risk factors" include smoking, poorly-controlled diabetes, and inherited (genetic) susceptibility.

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