Results of the PARTNER Trial Cohort B 2-year follow up presented at TCT 2011

November 10, 2011, Cardiovascular Research Foundation

A two-year study of patients in the landmark PARTNER trial, which compared transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients who have severe aortic stenosis and are not candidates for open heart surgery, confirm the one-year findings and support the role of TAVR as the standard of care.

Trial results were presented today at the 23rd annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium, sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation.

Cohort B of the PARTNER trial – those patients with severe aortic stenosis who were not candidates for surgery - randomized 358 patients to transfemoral TAVR with an early generation balloon-expandable bovine pericardial valve or standard therapy (ST, including balloon valvuloplasty) at 21 centers, emphasizing a multi-disciplinary heart team approach.

The primary end point was death from any cause at one year and secondary endpoints included symptom status, serial echo assessments (core lab) and early/late adverse events (e.g. strokes).

After two years, the rate of all cause mortality was 18.2% in the TAVR group and 35.1% in the standard therapy group. The rate of cardiovascular mortality was 13.2% in the TAVR group and 32.1% in the standard therapy group.

The rate of repeat hospitalization was 35.0% in the TAVR group and 72.5% in the standard therapy group.

The rate of stroke at two years was higher – 13.8% in the TAVR group and 5.5% in the standard therapy group.

"At two years, in patients with symptomatic who are not suitable candidates for surgery, TAVR remained superior to standard therapy with incremental benefit from one to two years markedly reducing the rates of all cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and repeat hospitalization," said Raj R. Makkar, MD, the principal site investigator for the PARTNER trial. Dr. Makkar is Director of Interventional Cardiology and the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and Associate Director of the Cedars- Sinai Heart Institute

"There were more neurologic events in TAVR patients compared to standard therapy (16.2% vs. 5.5%; p = 0.003) with five new events (three strokes and two TIAs) between 1-2 years in TAVR patients. After 30 days, differences in stroke frequency were largely due to increased hemorrhagic strokes in TAVR patients." Dr. Makkar said.

"Two year data continues to support the role of TAVR as the standard-of-care for symptomatic patients with aortic stenosis who are not surgical candidates," said Dr. Makkar.

"The ultimate value of TAVR in 'inoperable' patients will depend on careful selection of patients who are not surgical candidates, and yet do not have extreme co-morbidities that overwhelm the benefits of TAVR."

Explore further: Heart valve replacement without opening the chest gives new option for non-operable patients

Related Stories

Heart valve replacement without opening the chest gives new option for non-operable patients

June 24, 2011
An innovative approach for implanting a new aortic heart valve without open-heart surgery is being offered at Rush University Medical Center to patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high-risk or not suitable candidates ...

New option for patients with untreatable, non-perative heart condition

June 28, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- An innovative approach for implanting a new aortic heart valve without open-heart surgery is being offered at Rush University Medical Center to patients with severe aortic stenosis who are at high-risk ...

Recommended for you

A nanoparticle inhalant for treating heart disease

January 18, 2018
A team of researchers from Italy and Germany has developed a nanoparticle inhalant for treating people suffering from heart disease. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the group describes ...

Starting periods before age of 12 linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke

January 15, 2018
Starting periods early—before the age of 12—is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life, suggests an analysis of data from the UK Biobank study, published online in the journal Heart.

'Decorated' stem cells could offer targeted heart repair

January 10, 2018
Although cardiac stem cell therapy is a promising treatment for heart attack patients, directing the cells to the site of an injury - and getting them to stay there - remains challenging. In a new pilot study using an animal ...

Two simple tests could help to pinpoint cause of stroke

January 10, 2018
Detecting the cause of the deadliest form of stroke could be improved by a simple blood test added alongside a routine brain scan, research suggests.

Exercise is good for the heart, high blood pressure is bad—researchers find out why

January 10, 2018
When the heart is put under stress during exercise, it is considered healthy. Yet stress due to high blood pressure is bad for the heart. Why? And is this always the case? Researchers of the German Centre for Cardiovascular ...

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery

January 10, 2018
Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.