Group programs to prevent childhood depression prove effective

December 7, 2011 By Milly Dawson

Psychological interventions to prevent depression in children and adolescents can be useful, with protective effects that last for up to a year, finds a new systematic review..

“Our results were encouraging because is so common. It’s one of the costliest disorders internationally,” said lead author Sally Merry, M.D., a pediatric psychiatrist with the department of psychological medicine at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. According to research cited in the new review, in 2002, depression ranked second greatest cause of disability in developed countries and first in many developing ones. The review appears in the current issue of The Cochrane Library, a publication of The Cochrane Collaboration, an international organization that evaluates medical research.

Depression can erode young people’s enjoyment of daily life, undercut their social relationships and school performance, and increase their risk of substance use, according to Tamar Mendelson, PhD., an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who focuses on strategies to prevent mental illnesses. She notes that a first episode of depression dramatically increases the risk of subsequent episodes, initiating what is often a recurring course of illness.

Preventing depression and other mental illnesses is critical for many reasons, said Mendelson. “For one, there are far too few clinicians to treat all the people suffering from depression and other mental illnesses.” She also points out that even effective, evidence-based treatments for depression do not work for all individuals. Even when care is available, many people with depression or other avoid seeking help because of stigma.

“By intervening before the start of a disorder, prevention strategies have the potential to avert a chronic, episodic course of mental illness. Thus, prevention efforts with children and adolescents are particularly critical,” Mendelson said.

The research team analyzed 53 studies, completed in various countries. The studies included a total of 14,406 participants between the ages of 5 and 19. The youngsters involved were free of depressive disorder at the time they began to participate in the prevention programs.

Young people who participated in prevention programs were significantly less likely to have a depressive disorder in the year following the program than youth who did not participate. The effect was the same whether the interventions were targeted toward a specific subset of children, such as just boys, or universal. The prevention programs were diverse and generally involved groups. “Group-based prevention strategies may offer a means of reaching more individuals than most treatment approaches,” said Mendelson. She added that prevention strategies are often less stigmatizing and therefore more acceptable to people than mental health treatments.

Most of the included some components of cognitive behavioral therapy. Other psychological programs emphasized self-efficacy, stress reduction techniques and methods for handling trauma and maintaining optimism.

Both Merry and Mendelson noted that with widespread depression among young people, these findings have importance for many audiences including young people and their parents, school personnel and healthcare professionals who serve children and families. Policy makers concerned with improving public health and controlling the massive costs associated with depression are also likely to be interested.  In many countries, note the authors, “governments are keen to take action” to limit the massive human and financial costs associated with depression.

Explore further: Depression prevention better than cure

More information: Merry, S.N., et al. (2011). Psychological and educational interventions for preventing depression in children and adolescents. The Cochrane Library, Issue 12, published online December 7.

Related Stories

Depression prevention better than cure

August 2, 2011
Eight out of ten Australians would radically change their risky behaviour if tests showed they had a genetic susceptibility to depression, a national study has found.

New research shows mental illness common, linked to heart disease

September 12, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- Mental illnesses -- led by anxiety disorders and depression -- now affect one-quarter of the US population according to new research. In Europe a similar proportion -- about 27 percent -- suffers from ...

Internet interventions beat depression

December 1, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- A new study from The Australian National University shows that online therapy programs can play a major and long-lasting role in treating depression.

Recommended for you

Talking to yourself can help you control stressful emotions

July 26, 2017
The simple act of silently talking to yourself in the third person during stressful times may help you control emotions without any additional mental effort than what you would use for first-person self-talk – the way people ...

Heart rate study tests emotional impact of Shakespeare

July 26, 2017
In a world where on-screen violence has become commonplace, Britain's Royal Shakespeare Company is turning to science to discover whether the playwright can still make our hearts race more than 400 years on.

Do all people experience similar near-death-experiences?

July 26, 2017
No one really knows what happens when we die, but many people have stories to tell about what they experienced while being close to death. People who have had a near-death-experience usually report very rich and detailed ...

Risk for bipolar disorder associated with faster aging

July 26, 2017
New King's College London research suggests that people with a family history of bipolar disorder may 'age' more rapidly than those without a history of the disease.

Visual clues we use during walking and when we use them

July 25, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A trio of researchers with the University of Texas and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has discovered which phase of visual information processing during human walking is used most to guide the feet accurately. ...

Toddlers begin learning rules of reading, writing at very early age, study finds

July 25, 2017
Even the proudest of parents may struggle to find some semblance of meaning behind the seemingly random mish-mash of letters that often emerge from a toddler's first scribbled and scrawled attempts at putting words on paper.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.