Study tests new treatments for the winter blues

January 19, 2012

If winter's long nights and cold weather have you feeling depressed, a new research study could lift your spirits. The study, lead by Janis Anderson, PH.D., an associate psychologist in the Brigham and Women's Hospital Department of Psychiatry, aims to help adult (ages 21-64) men and women with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) by comparing two new types of light technologies to determine which one works better.

For decades, researchers have known that exposing patients to bright light can alleviate the associated with SAD, but the technology to treat SAD has evolved considerably over the years. Today's high-tech light boxes are increasingly small, portable and powerful. This change may give a growing number of patients access to treatment.

Enrollment of 40 volunteers for the trial is now underway at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Participants who usually develop in the fall and winter will receive, at no cost to them, a form a light therapy. The effectiveness of the new technology will be measured over a period of six weeks to determine the effectiveness at reducing the symptoms of SAD.

Explore further: Winter holidays prime time for depression

More information: To learn more about enrolling in this research study, visit www.brighamandwomens.org/Resea … /Psychiatry/SAD.aspx

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irjsiq
not rated yet Jan 22, 2012
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) by comparing two new types of light...[q/]
(SAD) aka: Cabin Fever
Comparing 'Phoenix and Fort Yukon'!
'Cabin Fever' AK ...
Abundant Dark!
Very Abundant COLD!
'Cabin Fever' Phoenix ...
Abundant 'Light',
Abundant Heat!
Very Abundant HEAT!!!
i.e for a person, such as myself, having the need for Light (Of Out-of-Doors), is Frustrated by Oppressive HEAT!

Roy J Stewart,
Phoenix AZ USA

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