Ototoxicity rates in children receiving carboplatin studied

February 29, 2012
Ototoxicity rates in children receiving carboplatin studied

(HealthDay) -- Retinoblastoma patients who are younger than 6 months of age at the start of carboplatin treatment experience a higher incidence of ototoxicity, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Ibrahim Qaddoumi, M.D., of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., and colleagues reviewed the results of audiologic tests for 60 patients with retinoblastoma who received front-line treatment with systemic carboplatin and vincristine according to either the St. Jude RET-3 protocol (23 patients) or best (37 patients). Three different ototoxicity grading systems were used.

The researchers found that 12 patients (20 percent) developed ototoxicity at some point following initiation of treatment; ototoxicity resolved in two patients, leaving 10 patients (17 percent) with sustained hearing loss. Nine of these 10 patients had grade 3 or 4 ototoxicity. Ninety percent of the 10 patients with hearing loss were less than 6 months of age at the start of chemotherapy. Age at the start of chemotherapy was the only risk factor that significantly predicted sustained hearing loss, and younger age was associated with an increased incidence of hearing loss. The different ototoxicity grading systems showed good overall agreement for identifying otoxicity, and agreement was greatest between the Brock and Children's Cancer Group systems.

"Young patients with who were treated with systemic had a higher incidence of ototoxicity than previously reported," the authors write.

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Researchers release first draft of a genome-wide cancer 'dependency map'

July 27, 2017
In one of the largest efforts to build a comprehensive catalog of genetic vulnerabilities in cancer, researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have identified more than 760 genes ...

Cancer-death button gets jammed by gut bacterium

July 27, 2017
Researchers at Michigan Medicine and in China showed that a type of bacterium is associated with the recurrence of colorectal cancer and poor outcomes. They found that Fusobacterium nucleatum in the gut can stop chemotherapy ...

Long-sought mechanism of metastasis is discovered in pancreatic cancer

July 27, 2017
Cells, just like people, have memories. They retain molecular markers that at the beginning of their existence helped guide their development. Cells that become cancerous may be making use of these early memories to power ...

Blocking the back-door that cancer cells use to escape death by radiotherapy

July 27, 2017
A natural healing mechanism of the body may be reducing the efficiency of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients, according to a new study.

Manmade peptides reduce breast cancer's spread

July 27, 2017
Manmade peptides that directly disrupt the inner workings of a gene known to support cancer's spread significantly reduce metastasis in a mouse model of breast cancer, scientists say.

Glowing tumor technology helps surgeons remove hidden cancer cells

July 27, 2017
Surgeons were able to identify and remove a greater number of cancerous nodules from lung cancer patients when combining intraoperative molecular imaging (IMI) - through the use of a contrast agent that makes tumor cells ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.