Gene-based test identifies poor-prognosis colon cancers

March 9, 2012
Gene-Based test identifies poor-Prognosis colon cancers

(HealthDay) -- A sensitive and specific gene-based classifier can be used to identify BRAF mutant colon cancer tumors and a subpopulation of BRAF wild-type tumors with poor prognosis, according to a study published March 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

In an effort to develop a gene expression-based classifier to identify BRAF mutants with high sensitivity, Vlad Popovici, M.D., of the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics in Lausanne, and colleagues evaluated differential gene expression between BRAF mutant and non-BRAF, non-KRAS mutant cancers from 668 stage II and III samples.

The researchers developed a 64 gene-based classifier which identified BRAF mutant tumors with 96 percent sensitivity and 86 percent specificity. A subpopulation of patients who were BRAF wild type (30 percent of KRAS mutants, 13 percent of double wild type) were found to have poor overall survival and poor survival after relapse, similar to that seen in patients with BRAF mutations.

"A characteristic pattern of gene expression is associated with and accurately predicts BRAF mutation status and, in addition, identifies a population of BRAF mutated-like KRAS mutants and double wild-type patients with similarly ," the authors write. "This suggests a common biology between these tumors and provides a novel classification tool for cancers, adding prognostic and biologic information that is not captured by the mutation status alone."

Several authors disclosed financial relationships with Pfizer.

Explore further: BRAF addiction of thyroid cancers makes them therapeutically vulnerable

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial


Related Stories

BRAF addiction of thyroid cancers makes them therapeutically vulnerable

November 21, 2011
Papillary carcinoma is the most common form of thyroid cancer. Approximately one quarter of these carcinomas have mutations in the BRAF gene. The prevalence of such mutations is even greater in high-grade carcinomas, particularly ...

New drug, Vemurafenib, doubles survival of metastatic melanoma patients

March 1, 2012
A report published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that the 50 percent of metastatic melanoma patients with a specific genetic mutation benefit from the drug Vemurafenib – increasing median survival ...

New approaches may prevent certain side effects in BRAF mutation-positive melanoma

November 13, 2011
Findings from preclinical studies in a skin cancer model showed that next-generation BRAF inhibitors used alone, or first-generation BRAF inhibitors used in combination with an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, ...

Recommended for you

Study may explain failure of retinoic acid trials against breast cancer

July 25, 2017
Estrogen-positive breast cancers are often treated with anti-estrogen therapies. But about half of these cancers contain a subpopulation of cells marked by the protein cytokeratin 5 (CK5), which resists treatment—and breast ...

Physical activity could combat fatigue, cognitive decline in cancer survivors

July 25, 2017
A new study indicates that cancer patients and survivors have a ready weapon against fatigue and "chemo brain": a brisk walk.

Breaking the genetic resistance of lung cancer and melanoma

July 25, 2017
Researchers from Monash University and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC, New York) have discovered why some cancers – particularly lung cancer and melanoma – are able to quickly develop deadly resistance ...

New therapeutic approach for difficult-to-treat subtype of ovarian cancer identified

July 24, 2017
A potential new therapeutic strategy for a difficult-to-treat form of ovarian cancer has been discovered by Wistar scientists. The findings were published online in Nature Cell Biology.

Immune cells the missing ingredient in new bladder cancer treatment

July 24, 2017
New research offers a possible explanation for why a new type of cancer treatment hasn't been working as expected against bladder cancer.

Anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent inhibits glioblastoma growth and radiation resistance

July 24, 2017
Glioblastoma is a primary brain tumor with dismal survival rates, even after treatment with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. A small subpopulation of tumor cells—glioma stem cells—is responsible for glioblastoma's ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.