Study finds link between relationship style and sexual dysfunction

March 7, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- Deakin University research has shown that being too needy or not needy enough in a relationship can result in sexual issues.

Christina Stefanou is conducting her doctoral research with Deakin's School of Psychology under the supervision of Professor Marita McCabe and is looking at the connection between relationship style and sexual functioning.

Preliminary results from the experiences of the 127 people who have taken part in the study so far demonstrate the strong links between relationship style and sexual dysfunction in both men and women.

"The preliminary analysis showed that individuals who fear rejection or abandonment and value intimacy to such an extent that they become overly dependent on their partner, had higher levels of sexual dysfunction (i.e., with sexual arousal, lubrication, orgasm, and in women, and erectile function, orgasm, intercourse satisfaction, and overall sexual satisfaction in men)," Ms Stefanou said.

"Similarly, individuals who experience discomfort with closeness and find it difficult to depend on their partner also had higher levels of sexual dysfunction (i.e., with , arousal, lubrication, orgasm, pain, and sexual satisfaction in women, although no relationships were found with dysfunction in men).

"These findings suggest that rather than simply treating the symptoms of sexual dysfunction, treatment strategies may be more effective if they considered the that impact on sexual behaviour within relationships."

Explore further: Sexual satisfaction in women increases with age

More information: Ms Stefanou's study is ongoing and if you would like to complete the questionnaire, please go to this link.

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Voleure
not rated yet Mar 07, 2012
Gem in there "...although no relationships were found with dysfunction in men"

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