New 'massage method' quadruples protection against tooth decay

March 26, 2012
“This ‘massage’ method proved to be at least as effective as a third brushing in increasing the amount of fluoride in the mouth,” Anna Nordström explains. Credit: Photo: University of Gothenburg

Do you really want to avoid cavities in your teeth? Try massaging them with a high-fluoride toothpaste after lunch.

"Rubbing onto your increases the fluoride protection by 400%," says Anna Nordström, dentist, PhD and researcher at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Eight years ago a new brand of toothpaste was launched in Sweden with more than three times as much fluoride as standard toothpaste. Available without prescription, it is aimed primarily at those with high caries risk.

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg's Sahlgrenska Academy have now performed the first scientific evaluation of the effect of this so called "high-fluoride toothpaste". The study has resulted in a new method that quadruples the level of protection from fluoride.

In the study, 16 volunteers tested a variety of brushing techniques, using either high-fluoride or standard toothpaste, and brushing either two or three times a day. "The study revealed that those who used a high-fluoride toothpaste three times a day had four times better fluoride in the mouth than those who used standard toothpaste twice a day," says researcher Anna Nordström from the Institute of Odontology at the Sahlgrenska Academy.

Also tested was a new method developed in collaboration with professor Dowen Birkhed, which involves rubbing toothpaste onto your teeth with a finger. "This 'massage' method proved to be at least as effective as a third brushing in increasing the amount of fluoride in the mouth," Anna Nordström explains. "Rubbing the front of your teeth with toothpaste can be an easy way of giving your teeth a third "shot" of fluoride during the day, after lunch for example. But this should not replace brushing with a fluoride toothpaste morning and evening – it's an extra."

Brushing with fluoride toothpaste has played – and continues to play – a major role in combating tooth decay, and there is strong scientific evidence that daily use of has a pronounced preventive effect.

More information: The study Effect of a third application of toothpaste (1450 and 5000 ppm F), including a "massage" method, on fluoride retention and pH drop in plaque was published in Acta Odontologica Scandinavia. Link to article: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22320714

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Research shows aspirin could repair tooth decay

September 8, 2017
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have discovered that aspirin could reverse the effects of tooth decay resulting in a reduction in the need for fillings. Currently about 7 million fillings are provided by the NHS ...

New dental imaging method uses squid ink to fish for gum disease

September 7, 2017
Squid ink might be a great ingredient to make black pasta, but it could also one day make getting checked for gum disease at the dentist less tedious and even painless. By combining squid ink with light and ultrasound, a ...

A new dental restoration composite proves more durable than the conventional material

August 21, 2017
Fewer trips to the dentist may be in your future, and you have mussels to thank.

Small molecule inhibitor prevents or impedes tooth cavities in a preclinical model

August 10, 2017
University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have created a small molecule that prevents or impedes tooth cavities in a preclinical model. The inhibitor blocks the function of a key virulence enzyme in an oral bacterium, ...

Understanding genetic synergy in cleft palate

July 19, 2017
Like all of the individual elements of fetal development, palate growth is a marvel of nature. In part of this process, ledges of tissue on the sides of the face grow downwards on each side of the tongue, then upward, fusing ...

Use of prefabricated blood vessels may revolutionize root canals

June 12, 2017
While root canals are effective in saving a tooth that has become infected or decayed, this age-old procedure may cause teeth to become brittle and susceptible to fracture over time. Now researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

that_guy
5 / 5 (1) Mar 26, 2012
the 'massage' method is an innovative idea, but I take issue with the following statement.

"The study revealed that those who used a high-fluoride toothpaste three times a day had four times better fluoride protection in the mouth than those who used standard toothpaste twice a day"


You don't say? If you brush more often with higher flouride content, then you get more flouride protection? No shit?

I think it would have been more informative if you had more comparison groups. 3 times a day with regular, and twice a day with high flouride, etc.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.