Vaccinations aren't just for kids: Report focuses on benefits of adult immunizations

March 14, 2012

Despite the many overwhelming successes of vaccines in the past century, including the eradication of smallpox and near-eradication of polio, many adults do not know how vaccines work, or even realize that the benefits of vaccination do not end in childhood. To help raise awareness of the importance of vaccines for adults, the American Academy of Microbiology has issued a new report entitled FAQ: Adult Vaccines – A Grown Up Thing to Do.

"Because 40,000 in the US die each year of vaccine-preventable diseases, it is important for adults to be aware of the options available to them for vaccination" says Dr. Nicola Klein of the Kaiser Permanente Study Center, a steering committee member for the .

The report is based on a colloquium convened by the Academy in late 2011, which brought together 18 of the nation's leading experts to consider and answer some of the most frequently asked questions about vaccines for adults. It provides non-technical, science-based answers to questions that people may have regarding immunization.

Some of the questions the report considers include:

  • What are vaccines and how do they work?
  • Why do adults need to be vaccinated?
  • How can getting vaccinated as an adult help protect my children? Or elderly parents?
  • Are vaccines safe – and how do we know this?
FAQ: Adult Vaccines – A Grown Up Thing to Do is the latest offering in a series of reports designed to provide a rapid response to emerging issues. The FAQ series are based on single-day meetings focused on specific questions and reports are issued quickly - within 2-3 months. Previous FAQ reports have covered topics like the role of microorganisms in cleaning up oil spills and the multifaceted bacterium E. coli.

"The Academy FAQ reports explain complex microbiological problems in a timely, balanced format that is easily understandable by the public, the media and policy makers," says Stanley Maloy of San Diego State University.

Explore further: Report answers questions about E. coli: The good, the bad and the deadly

Related Stories

Report answers questions about E. coli: The good, the bad and the deadly

November 15, 2011
It has been the cause of infamous international foodborne disease outbreaks and yet it is the most studied bacterium in science, an essential part of the human digestive tract, and a backbone of the biotech industry. To enhance ...

2012 adult immunization schedule broadens recommendations for HPV and hepatitis B vaccinations

February 1, 2012
The CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) now recommends routine HPV vaccination for males aged 11 to 12 years and catch-up vaccination for males aged 13 to 21. These are just two of the changes to the ...

Best way to boost adult immunizations is through office-based action, study finds

January 11, 2012
Promoting immunizations as a part of routine office-based medical practice is needed to improve adult vaccination rates, a highly effective way to curb the spread of diseases across communities, prevent needless illness and ...

Recommended for you

Immune cells turn back time to achieve memory

December 13, 2017
Memory T cells earn their name by embodying the memory of the immune system - they help the body remember what infections or vaccines someone has been exposed to. But to become memory T cells, the cells go backwards in time, ...

Steroid study sheds light on long term side effects of medicines

December 13, 2017
Fresh insights into key hormones found in commonly prescribed medicines have been discovered, providing further understanding of the medicines' side effects.

The immune cells that help tumors instead of destroying them

December 12, 2017
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. One of the most promising ways to treat it is by immunotherapy, a strategy that turns the patient's immune system against the tumor. In the past twenty years, ...

Cancer gene plays key role in cystic fibrosis lung infections

December 12, 2017
PTEN is best known as a tumor suppressor, a type of protein that protects cells from growing uncontrollably and becoming cancerous. But according to a new study from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), PTEN has a second, ...

Researchers bring new insight into Chediak-Higashi syndrome, a devastating genetic disease

December 12, 2017
A team of researchers from the National Institutes of Health and University of Manchester have uncovered new insights into a rare genetic disease, with less than 500 cases of the disease on record, which devastates the lives ...

Drug increases speed, safety of treatment for multiple food allergies

December 11, 2017
In a randomized, controlled phase-2 clinical trial, an asthma medication increased the speed and safety of a protocol used to treat children for several food allergies at once, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Marlo
not rated yet Mar 15, 2012
I would like to know where they come up with the statistics of 40,000 adults dying each year from vaccine preventable diseases. Sounds like they are taking the number quoted for flu deaths per year. What is needed to know is that according to the British Medical Journal, these numbers are inflated. The actual number of flu deaths is around 800-1000 per year. The rest are pneumonia deaths. And neither are prevented by the vaccine.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.