Vaccination

Global vaccine group urges virus solidarity ahead of summit

The head of the global vaccine alliance has warned "nobody is safe unless everybody is safe" from the new coronavirus, urging international solidarity ahead of a fundraising summit as the pandemic threatens to trigger a resurgence ...

Vaccination

An accelerated COVID-19 vaccine? Not so fast

Despite headlines suggesting a COVID-19 vaccine might be coming soon, experts at Rice University's Baker Institute of Public Policy warn that a viable vaccine is likely at least a year away.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Monkeys, ferrets offer needed clues in COVID-19 vaccine race

The global race for a COVID-19 vaccine boils down to some critical questions: How much must the shots rev up someone's immune system to really work? And could revving it the wrong way cause harm?

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Taming COVID-19 requires urgent search for both vaccine and treatment

Bonnie Robeson, a senior lecturer at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, knows what it's like to take part in an urgent race to find a vaccine or treatment for a lethal malady, such as the current effort to contain the ...

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Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variolæ vaccinæ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA