Oncology & Cancer

More evidence HPV vaccine reduces precancerous lesions

The HPV vaccine has led to a significant reduction in the rate of cervical abnormalities in young New Zealand women, which is likely to result in reduced rates of cervical cancer in future, new University of Otago research ...

Pediatrics

Whooping cough evolving into a superbug

Whooping cough bacteria are becoming smarter at colonizing and feeding off unwitting hosts, strengthening calls for a new vaccine, according to UNSW researchers.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

1st malaria vaccine tried out in babies in 3 African nations

A pinch in the leg, a squeal and a trickle of tears. One baby after another in Malawi is getting the first and only vaccine against malaria, one of history's deadliest and most stubborn of diseases.

Medical research

A solid vaccine for liquid tumors

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a deadly blood cancer that originates in the bone marrow and kills most of its victims within five years. Chemotherapy has been the standard AML treatment for over 40 years, and while it often ...

Health

Authors say vaccine advocates must harness power of story

You know that old saw about how doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result constitutes insanity? Well, a new paper by researchers in the Department of Communication Studies at the University of Kansas ...

Pediatrics

Mandatory vaccination ups prevalence of vaccine coverage

(HealthDay)—Mandatory vaccination is associated with increased vaccination coverage for measles and pertussis as well as reduced measles incidence in Europe, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Pediatrics.

Oncology & Cancer

Can the flu shot help fight cancer?

Changing the microenvironment of tumors to increase the immune system's response to them has been the goal of countless research and clinical studies including the most recent use of checkpoint inhibitory antibodies. The ...

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Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variolæ vaccinæ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA