Pediatrics

Kids aren't skipping just COVID vaccines

There are thousands of children across Maryland who not only haven't been vaccinated against COVID-19, but also lack protection from influenza and the kinds of diseases that routine shots long ago made scarce, such as measles ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

WHO: Nearly 200 cases of monkeypox in more than 20 countries

The World Health Organization says nearly 200 cases of monkeypox have been reported in more than 20 countries not usually known to have outbreaks of the unusual disease, but described the epidemic as "containable" and proposed ...

Medical research

COVID vaccine development was quick. What's holding HIV back?

While multiple effective COVID-19 vaccines were developed with astonishing speed, it has been more than 40 years since University of Rochester alumnus Michael Gottlieb, M.D., first described the disease that became known ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Expert outlines how concerned the public should be about monkeypox

Health officials are investigating the monkeypox outbreak to determine if the virus acquired a mutation that makes it more transmissible or if superspreader events in Europe may be to blame for the current outbreak.

Oncology & Cancer

New vaccine type overcomes cancerous tumor defenses

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S. and one in Japan has developed a new type of vaccine that helps the immune system destroy cancerous tumors by overcoming their defense system. In their ...

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Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variolæ vaccinæ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA