Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Only 57 percent of Americans say they would get a COVID-19 vaccine

Despite widespread agreement among experts that having a prophylactic COVID-19 vaccine will be critical to the nation's ability to safely return to some form of normalcy, only 57% of Americans say they would get a COVID-19 ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

U.S. sees another record-breaking day of new coronavirus cases

(HealthDay)—States across America reported nearly 60,000 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, setting yet another daily record as the pandemic tightens its grip on a country struggling to reopen.

Oncology & Cancer

A breakthrough with a new cancer vaccine

Scientists are ready to trial a new cancer vaccine in humans following the successful outcome of their preclinical studies.

Gerontology & Geriatrics

2008 to 2018 saw increase in shingles vaccination in over-60s

(HealthDay)—From 2008 to 2018, there was an increase in shingles vaccination among adults aged 60 years and older, with demographic, socioeconomic, and geographic variations in vaccination rates, according to a July data ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Challenges in evaluating SARS-CoV-2 vaccines

With more than 140 SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in development, the race is on for a successful candidate to help prevent COVID-19. An effective and safe vaccine would be a major advance in the fight against COVID-19. However, there ...

page 1 from 9

Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variolæ vaccinæ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA