Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Antibodies from earlier exposures affect response to new flu strains

We are repeatedly exposed to the influenza virus via infections, vaccinations and our communal environments. The annual flu shot is believed to be the best line of defense, and doctors recommend vaccinations every year because ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

AAP: Nasal spray vaccine against flu acceptable in 2019 to 2020

(HealthDay)—The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) plans to advise families to vaccinate children against influenza with either the flu shot or nasal spray vaccine during the 2019 to 2020 flu season, in contrast to the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Niger sounds alarm over 'fake' meningitis vaccine

Health authorities in Niger said Friday they had found a fake version of a meningitis vaccine after the country had launched a campaign to innoculate millions of children against the disease.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

When is best time to get flu shot? Analysis compares scenarios

When flu season peaks after mid-winter, tens of thousands of influenza cases and hundreds of deaths can likely be avoided if older adults wait until October to get their flu immunization, a University of Pittsburgh School ...

Immunology

Researchers report metric of immune system's biological clock

A new study published in Nature Medicine from scientists at the Technion, Stanford and CytoReason describes for the first time ever a way to quantify a person's "immune age." This game-changing capability provides a much ...

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Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variolæ vaccinæ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA