Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Getting to the bottom of anti-vaccine attitudes

A study that helps explain why anti-vaccine attitudes still persist, despite clear evidence on the benefits of immunization to public health has been selected by an international scientific committee to be given the Atlas ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Vaccines: not just for kids

(HealthDay)—If you have children, you know how important it is to keep up with their immunization schedule.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Flu season: What you need to know to stay healthy

Each year, particularly during the winter months, millions of Americans are infected with influenza. The flu causes symptoms such as fever, coughing, body aches and fatigue, and, in some cases, can lead to serious complications ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Q&A: Even the young and healthy benefit from the flu vaccine

Dear Mayo Clinic: I am 28 and healthy. I have never gotten a flu shot and have never had the flu. Do I really need a flu vaccination? My employer is recommending it for everyone, but I am hesitant. I have heard some people ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Danish malaria vaccine passes test in humans

For many years, a team of researchers at the University of Copenhagen have been developing a vaccine that can protect against pregnancy malaria, from which 220,000 people die every year.

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Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variolæ vaccinæ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA