Medical research

Safer viruses for vaccine research and diagnosis

A new technology to produce safer 'hybrid' viruses at high volumes for use in vaccines and diagnostics for mosquito-borne diseases has been developed at The University of Queensland.

Immunology

Simulating amino acid starvation may improve dengue vaccines

Eating a low-calorie diet can help you live longer and prevent age-related diseases—and even improve the immune system's function. A new study finds that, in mice, a compound used in herbal medicine can give a similar immune ...

HIV & AIDS

Creating viral targets can weaken HIV vaccination

Vaccination against HIV can backfire if the vaccine induces the wrong kind of immune response. Scientists at Emory University's Yerkes National Primate Research Center have evidence—gleaned from several nonhuman primate ...

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Vaccine

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains a small amount of an agent that resembles a microorganism. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of the term cow pox (Latin variolæ vaccinæ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA