Bone metabolism, vitamin D key in postkyphoplasty breaks

Bone metabolism, vitamin D key in postkyphoplasty breaks
(HealthDay) -- For postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, bone metabolism and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels are associated with postkyphoplasty recurrent vertebral compression fractures, according to a study published online April 12 in The Spine Journal.

To investigate the incidence of recurrent fractures after , Christos P. Zafeiris, M.D., of the University of Athens in Greece, and colleagues conducted a prospective study of 40 postmenopausal women (mean age, 70.6 years) with osteoporosis and acute symptomatic vertebral compression fractures, who underwent a total of 98 kyphoplasties. The association between status of bone metabolism and 25(OH)D levels and fractures was examined. Patients were followed for 18 months.

After initial kyphoplasty, the researchers found that nine patients (22.5 percent) developed a vertebral compression fracture; in seven patients (17.5 percent), cement leakage was identified. Compared to patients with recurrent fractures, higher levels of 25(OH)D and lower N-terminal cross linked telopeptide values were seen in patients without recurrent factures.

" and 25(OH)D levels seem to play a role in the occurrence of postkyphoplasty recurrent ," the authors write.


Explore further

IOF urges systematic osteoporosis management after vertebral fracture augmentation

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Citation: Bone metabolism, vitamin D key in postkyphoplasty breaks (2012, April 25) retrieved 21 February 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-04-bone-metabolism-vitamin-d-key.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more