Hypertension study proves treatment with RAAS inhibitors saves lives

April 18, 2012

Treatment with an ACE inhibitor for lowering high blood pressure showed a significant mortality reduction in patients with a high prevalence of hypertension, according to a report published in the European Heart Journal, the flagship journal of the European Society of Cardiology.

In the study, 20 different trials including nearly 160,000 randomly selected patients with high blood pressure were treated with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors or control treatment, such as placebo or normal care with a mean follow up of 4.3 years. RAAS inhibitors showed a 5% reduction in all-cause mortality and a 7% reduction in when compared with control antihypertensive therapy.

However, in a stratified study according to the class of drug, the overall all-cause mortality reduction was a result of the beneficial effect of the class of ACE inhibitors, showing a significant 10% reduction, whereas the AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) had no reduction.

"The guideline recommended goal of antihypertensive treatment is , however this is the first study that scientifically evaluates the value of RAAS inhibitors on mortality in their main indication of hypertension," said lead author Prof Laura van Vark, Department of Cardiology at Erasmus in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Because there are usually no symptoms associated with high blood pressure, most patients don't realize they have the disease, nor do they know about medication needed. Treatments for high blood pressure may cause side effects, making it a challenge to patients' adherence. This is why there is a strong need for medications with beneficial effects on mortality.

Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, claiming nearly eight million lives worldwide each year, which represent 13% of all deaths. Medication and healthy lifestyle modifications, such as no smoking and regular physical activity, generally lead to better , however for many patients medication is also still necessary.

Explore further: Similar blood pressure drugs could have different impacts on dialysis patients' heart health

Related Stories

Similar blood pressure drugs could have different impacts on dialysis patients' heart health

December 8, 2011
Two seemingly similar blood pressure–lowering drugs have different effects on the heart health of dialysis patients, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology ...

High blood pressure in early pregnancy raises risk of birth defects, irrespective of medication

October 18, 2011
Women with high blood pressure (hypertension) in the early stages of pregnancy are more likely to have babies with birth defects, irrespective of commonly prescribed medicines for their condition, finds new research published ...

Blood pressure drugs may offer benefits in valvular heart disease

August 1, 2011
Drugs used to treat blood pressure could offer significant benefits to patients with one of the most common forms of valvular heart disease, new research at the University of Dundee and NHS Tayside has revealed.

Recommended for you

Could aggressive blood pressure treatments lead to kidney damage?

July 18, 2017
Aggressive combination treatments for high blood pressure that are intended to protect the kidneys may actually be damaging the organs, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

Quantifying effectiveness of treatment for irregular heartbeat

July 17, 2017
In a small proof-of-concept study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the ...

Concerns over side effects of statins stopping stroke survivors taking medication

July 17, 2017
Negative media coverage of the side effects associated with taking statins, and patients' own experiences of taking the drugs, are among the reasons cited by stroke survivors and their carers for stopping taking potentially ...

Study discovers anticoagulant drugs are being prescribed against safety advice

July 17, 2017
A study by researchers at the University of Birmingham has shown that GPs are prescribing anticoagulants to patients with an irregular heartbeat against official safety advice.

Protein may protect against heart attack

July 14, 2017
DDK3 could be used as a new therapy to stop the build-up of fatty material inside the arteries

Heart study finds faulty link between biomarkers and clinical outcomes

July 14, 2017
Surrogate endpoints (biomarkers), which are routinely used in clinical research to test new drugs, should not be trusted as the ultimate measure to approve new health interventions in cardiovascular medicine, according to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.