Variety of fruits, vegetables linked to lower diabetes risk

April 9, 2012
Variety of fruits, vegetables linked to lower diabetes risk

(HealthDay) -- Eating a greater quantity of vegetables and a greater variety of fruits and vegetables (F&V) correlates with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a study published online April 3 in Diabetes Care.

Andrew J. Cooper, M.Phil., of Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, U.K., and colleagues investigated the 11-year incidence of T2D in correlation with F&V intake in 3,704 participants (653 cases) nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Norfolk study. The variety of F&V consumed was derived from the total number of different items consumed, recorded in a seven-day prospective food diary.

When comparing extreme tertiles, the researchers found that consumption of a greater quantity of F&V correlated with a lower risk of T2D (hazard ratio [HR], 0.79). In adjusted analyses, the quantity of vegetable intake, but not intake, was inversely associated with T2D (HR, 0.76). Greater variety in fruit, vegetable, and combined F&V intake correlated with a reduced risk of T2D (HRs, 0.70, 0.77, and 0.61, respectively), when comparing extreme tertiles.

"These findings suggest that a diet characterized by a greater quantity of and a greater variety of both F&V intake is associated with a reduced risk of T2D," the authors write.

Explore further: Genetic risks for type 2 diabetes span multiple ethnicities

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)


Related Stories

Genetic risks for type 2 diabetes span multiple ethnicities

February 9, 2012
A recent large and comprehensive analysis of 50,000 genetic variants across 2,000 genes linked to cardiovascular and metabolic function has identified four genes associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and six independent disease-associated ...

Fruits and vegetables reduce risks of specific types of colorectal cancers

September 26, 2011
The effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on colorectal cancer (CRC) appear to differ by site of origin, according to a new study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association. Researchers ...

Recommended for you

Experts devise plan to slash unnecessary medical testing

October 17, 2017
Researchers at top hospitals in the U.S. and Canada have developed an ambitious plan to eliminate unnecessary medical testing, with the goal of reducing medical bills while improving patient outcomes, safety and satisfaction.

New study: Nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency rooms

October 17, 2017
Nearly half of all US medical care is delivered by emergency departments, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). And in recent years, the percentage of care delivered ...

No evidence that widely marketed technique to treat leaky bladder/prolapse works

October 16, 2017
There is no scientific evidence that a workout widely marketed to manage the symptoms of a leaky bladder and/or womb prolapse actually works, conclude experts in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports ...

Ten pence restaurant chain levy on sugary drinks linked to fall in sales

October 16, 2017
The introduction of a 10 pence levy on sugar sweetened drinks across the 'Jamie's Italian' chain of restaurants in the UK was associated with a relatively large fall in sales of these beverages of between 9 and 11 per cent, ...

New exercises help athletes manage dangerous breathing disorder

October 16, 2017
A novel set of breathing techniques developed at National Jewish Health help athletes overcome vocal cord dysfunction and improve performance during high-intensity exercise. Vocal cord dysfunction, now also referred to as ...

Learning and staying in shape key to longer lifespan, study finds

October 13, 2017
People who are overweight cut their life expectancy by two months for every extra kilogramme of weight they carry, research suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.