Genetics

BICRA gene provides answers to patients, doctors and scientists

Physicians and scientists are constantly on the lookout for new disease genes that can help them understand why patients have undiagnosed medical problems. Often the first clues come from genetic testing that reveals a change ...

Health

New study reveals the science behind springtime lethargy

The quality and restfulness of your sleep are heavily influenced by environmental conditions, such as noise, light, humidity, and nutrient intakes. Besides, the temperature of our surrounding environment is another important ...

Neuroscience

The protein dress of a neuron

Where in a nerve cell is a certain receptor protein located? Without an answer to this question, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions about the function of this protein. Two scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology ...

Neuroscience

Time-keeping brain protein influences memory

Upsetting the brain's timekeeping can cause cognitive impairments, like when jetlag makes you feel foggy and forgetful. These impairments may stem from disrupting a protein that aligns the brain's time-keeping mechanism to ...

Health

Persimmons pack plenty of nutritional punch

Persimmons are low in calories and high in fiber—a combination that makes them a good choice for weight control. Their mix of antioxidants and nutrients—including vitamins A and C—makes them ideal for a healthy diet.

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Fruit

The term fruit has different meanings dependent on context, and the term is not synonymous in food preparation and biology. Fruits are the means by which flowering plants disseminate seeds, and the presence of seeds indicates that a structure is most likely a fruit, though not all seeds come from fruits.

No single terminology really fits the enormous variety that is found among plant fruits. The term 'false fruit' (pseudocarp, accessory fruit) is sometimes applied to a fruit like the fig (a multiple-accessory fruit; see below) or to a plant structure that resembles a fruit but is not derived from a flower or flowers. Some gymnosperms, such as yew, have fleshy arils that resemble fruits and some junipers have berry-like, fleshy cones. The term "fruit" has also been inaccurately applied to the seed-containing female cones of many conifers.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA