Neuroscience

Losing neurons is sometimes not all bad

Current thinking about Alzheimer's disease is that neuronal cell death in the brain is to blame for the cognitive havoc caused by the disease. But a new study suggests that neuronal death may actually be a protective reaction ...

Health

Is juice on school menus a problem?

(HealthDay)—When given the option, students in school meal programs are more likely to choose fruit juice over more nutritious whole fruit or milk, a new study finds.

Health

Follow the mediterranean diet for weight loss, too

(HealthDay)—When the 2015 U.S. Dietary Guidelines were released, they included details for following the Mediterranean-style diet. That's the way of eating in countries that border the Mediterranean Sea and has been associated ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Deadly Marburg virus found in Sierra Leone bats

Scientists have discovered Marburg virus in fruit bats in Sierra Leone. This is the first time the deadly virus has been found in West Africa. Five Egyptian rousette fruit bats tested positive for active Marburg virus infection. ...

Health

The right way to fuel up before workouts

(HealthDay)—Mom was right when she said no swimming for an hour after lunch. Even though it takes energy to work out, it's important that exercise doesn't interfere with digestion.

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Fruit

The term fruit has different meanings dependent on context, and the term is not synonymous in food preparation and biology. Fruits are the means by which flowering plants disseminate seeds, and the presence of seeds indicates that a structure is most likely a fruit, though not all seeds come from fruits.

No single terminology really fits the enormous variety that is found among plant fruits. The term 'false fruit' (pseudocarp, accessory fruit) is sometimes applied to a fruit like the fig (a multiple-accessory fruit; see below) or to a plant structure that resembles a fruit but is not derived from a flower or flowers. Some gymnosperms, such as yew, have fleshy arils that resemble fruits and some junipers have berry-like, fleshy cones. The term "fruit" has also been inaccurately applied to the seed-containing female cones of many conifers.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA