Words from a formerly fat physician

April 10, 2012

For obese patients, losing weight may require a different solution than calorie reduction and exercise, writes a formerly obese physician in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Despite having detailed knowledge of the of obesity, Dr. Ben Williams, now a family medicine resident, could not lose weight beyond short-term losses. "Losing weight was the easy part, keeping it off was the challenge," he writes. "Oh, and I exercised a lot too; I just ate a lot more."

He credits bariatric surgery for his success at shedding 110 pounds and counting from his original weight of 320.

"I was fat because I ate too much, and my surgeon helped me do what I had been unable to do on my own."

Dr. Williams notes, from first-hand experience, that advice to patients to exercise more and cut calories may not be effective and that other solutions may be necessary.

Explore further: Heavy exercise not too high a hurdle for bariatric surgery patients

More information: DOI:10.1503/cmaj.120251

Related Stories

Heavy exercise not too high a hurdle for bariatric surgery patients

July 7, 2011
Bariatric surgery patients can undertake a rigorous exercise program after the procedure, in order to continue to lose weight and avoid regaining weight, according to a UT Southwestern Medical Center study.

Losing the weight but not the stigma

March 9, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Obese people who lose weight will encounter far less social stigma and may even be seen as fitter than if they had been lean all along, but they may still face prejudice relating to how they lost weight, ...

Exercise plays key role in managing obesity: study

February 21, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- In spite of recent media reports suggesting that exercise may not be useful in obesity management, overweight and obese people should not be discouraged from taking it up, according to a paper published ...

Study finds diet plus exercise is more effective for weight loss than either method alone

April 14, 2011
Everyone knows that eating a low-fat, low-calorie diet and getting regular exercise helps shed pounds, but a new study led by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has found that when it comes to losing weight ...

Recommended for you

Why sugary drinks and protein-rich meals don't go well together

July 20, 2017
Having a sugar-sweetened drink with a high-protein meal may negatively affect energy balance, alter food preferences and cause the body to store more fat, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Nutrition.

Opioids and obesity, not 'despair deaths,' raising mortality rates for white Americans

July 20, 2017
Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according ...

Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding three risky behaviors

July 20, 2017
We've heard it before from our doctors and other health experts: Keep your weight down, don't smoke and cut back on the alcohol if you want to live longer.

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking

July 20, 2017
Fewer teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Australian school students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers.

Fresh fish oil lowers diabetes risk in rat offspring

July 19, 2017
Fresh fish oil given to overweight pregnant rats prevented their offspring from developing a major diabetes risk factor, Auckland researchers have found.

High-dose vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles for children

July 18, 2017
Giving children high doses of vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles, a new study has found.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.