Bacteria study of male adolescents reveals new insights into urinary tract health

May 14, 2012
J. Dennis Fortenberry. Credit: Indiana University

(Medical Xpress) -- The first study using cultivation independent sequencing of the microorganisms in the adolescent male urinary tract has revealed that the composition of microbial communities colonizing the penis in young men depends upon their circumcision status and patterns of sexual activity.

This study, published Friday in the online journal , is the first by Indiana University researchers working with a four-year, $7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's Human Microbiome Project. It is also the first to reveal that urogenital of young are surprisingly stable and that some of these are similar to species that colonize and protect healthy young women from sexually transmitted infections.

The research contradicts the accepted wisdom that pre-sexual men did not have bacteria in their urinary tracts.

"Young men had bacteria that looked similar to those of young healthy women," said David E. Nelson, Ph.D., an assistant professor of biology in the College of Arts and Sciences at IU Bloomington and the principal investigator of the research. "We think that these bacteria may promote genitourinary health in men, just as they do in women. This contradicts previous dogma that only sexually transmitted pathogens colonize the male urethra."

The findings open doors for additional research that will lead to a deeper understand of men's health.

"This is the first real investigator of the normal microbiology of men before they begin ," Nelson said. "There are parallels between normal bacteria in and those in young women that are known to be protective."

This discovery was not possible before the mapping of the and the development of powerful sequencing tools, said J. Dennis Fortenberry, M.D., M.S., principal investigator of the NIH grant and professor of pediatrics in the Division of at the IU School of Medicine.

The investigators used the advanced sequencing techniques to evaluate bacteria on the head of the penis as well as in the urethra in 18 adolescents younger than 18 years, he said. The researchers will follow these adolescents, along with dozens of others, for several years to determine how the types and amounts of bacteria present in and on the penis changes over time.

This study reports that the types of bacteria found on the penis were different than what was found in the urethra, and the bacteria found in circumcised adolescents differed from the bacteria found in the uncircumcised adolescents. These differences may be important in understanding why circumcision helps prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections in men.

They also discovered changes in the bacteria after sexual activity began.

"We have some sense that some of the bacteria in the urethra are essential to keeping men healthy," Fortenberry said. "This research and the new technology will open doors to explore what is good about the bacteria, what they do and how."

"At this point in the research, we are asking 'chicken and egg' questions," Nelson said. "What comes first, the loss of normal bacteria, making a person more susceptible to sexually transmitted infections or, do you get colonized with other bacteria for some reason and that puts a person more at risk of contracting an STI."

This research, like other longitudinal studies, should shed light on the sequence of events that leads to STIs and other diseases such as a common male condition called non-gonococcal urethritis, whose cause is unknown.

Fortenberry and Nelson said they decided that looking at the microbiome of a cohort of young, non-sexually active males was the only way to determine what bacteria was normal for men. Without that information, researchers can't determine the difference between healthy and unhealthy bacteria and know how to treat disease.

Explore further: Circumcision may help protect against prostate cancer

Related Stories

Circumcision may help protect against prostate cancer

March 12, 2012
A new analysis led by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has found that circumcision before a male's first sexual intercourse may help protect against prostate cancer. Published early online in Cancer, ...

Male circumcision lowers prevalence of penile precancerous lesions among African men

July 28, 2011
A University of North Carolina-led international study shows that among Kenyan men, circumcision is associated with a lower prevalence of human papillomavirus-associated precancerous lesions of the penis. Human papillomavirus ...

Study links empathy, self-esteem, and autonomy with increased sexual enjoyment

June 3, 2011
Sexual pleasure among young adults (ages 18-26) is linked to healthy psychological and social development, according to a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study is the ...

Recommended for you

New comparison chart sheds light on babies' tears

July 10, 2017
A chart that enables parents and clinicians to calculate if a baby is crying more than it should in the first three months of its life has been created by a Kingston University London researcher, following a study of colic ...

Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotonin

July 3, 2017
Blood samples from infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) had high levels of serotonin, a chemical that carries signals along and between nerves, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes ...

Is your child's 'penicillin allergy' real?

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Many children suspected of being allergic to the inexpensive, first-line antibiotic penicillin actually aren't, new research indicates.

Probiotic supplements failed to prevent babies' infections

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Probiotic supplements may not protect babies from catching colds or stomach bugs in day care, a new clinical trial suggests.

Starting school young can put child wellbeing at risk

June 22, 2017
New research has shown that the youngest pupils in each school year group could be at risk of worse mental health than their older classmates.

Fidget spinners are the latest toy craze, but the medical benefits are unclear

June 21, 2017
Last week, German customs agents in Frankfurt Airport seized 35 metric tons of an imported plastic device, destroying the shipment for public safety purposes before it could infiltrate the country's marketplaces.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.