Oncology & Cancer

Ancient viruses could help kill cancers

DNA "echoes" of viruses that infected our ancestors millions of years ago could help the immune system to identify and kill cancer cells, according to new research from Crick scientists.

Medical research

For gut microbes, not all types of fiber are created equal

Certain human gut microbes with links to health thrive when fed specific types of ingredients in dietary fibers, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Genetics

How your DNA takes shape makes a big difference in your health

The more we learn about our genome, the more mysteries arise. For example, how can people with the same disease-causing mutation have different disease progression and symptoms? And despite the fact that it's been more than ...

Neuroscience

The future of mind control

Electrodes implanted in the brain help alleviate symptoms like the intrusive tremors associated with Parkinson's disease. But current probes face limitations due to their size and inflexibility. "The brain is squishy and ...

Genetics

Researchers move beyond sequencing and create a 3-D genome

Like pirates on a treasure hunt, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have created the first 3-D map of a mouse genome and used it to discover scientific gold. The gold includes insight from machine learning into ...

Genetics

Scientists use advanced imaging to map uncharted area of genome

Using advanced imaging techniques, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have mapped a previously uncharted region of the human genome that gives rise to a variety of disease, setting the stage ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer susceptibility genes

Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified hundreds of genetic "risk" variants for human cancers. The vast majority likely contribute to cancer development by regulating the expression of other genes, but these ...

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Human genome

The human genome is the genome of Homo sapiens, which is stored on 23 chromosome pairs. Twenty-two of these are autosomal chromosome pairs, while the remaining pair is sex-determining. The haploid human genome occupies a total of just over 3 billion DNA base pairs. The Human Genome Project (HGP) produced a reference sequence of the euchromatic human genome, which is used worldwide in biomedical sciences.

The haploid human genome contains an estimated 20,000–25,000 protein-coding genes, far fewer than had been expected before its sequencing. In fact, only about 1.5% of the genome codes for proteins, while the rest consists of RNA genes, regulatory sequences, introns and (controversially) "junk" DNA.

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