Genetics

Scientists identify new genetic MND risk factor in junk DNA

A new genetic risk factor for Motor Neurone Disease (MND), which if treated could halt or prevent the degenerative condition, has been identified in so-called 'junk DNA' by scientists at the University of Sheffield. The newly ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Discovering the secrets of viral sequences in COVID-19

Since the beginning of 2020, labs from all around the world have been sequencing the material from positive tests of people affected by COVID-19 and then depositing sequences mostly to three points of collection: GenBank, ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer-fighting gene restrains 'jumping genes'

About half of all tumors have mutations of the gene p53, normally responsible for warding off cancer. Now, UT Southwestern scientists have discovered a new role for p53 in its fight against tumors: preventing retrotransposons, ...

Genetics

NHGRI publishes new vision for human genomics

The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), this week published its "Strategic vision for improving human health at The Forefront of Genomics" in the journal Nature. ...

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Human genome

The human genome is the genome of Homo sapiens, which is stored on 23 chromosome pairs. Twenty-two of these are autosomal chromosome pairs, while the remaining pair is sex-determining. The haploid human genome occupies a total of just over 3 billion DNA base pairs. The Human Genome Project (HGP) produced a reference sequence of the euchromatic human genome, which is used worldwide in biomedical sciences.

The haploid human genome contains an estimated 20,000–25,000 protein-coding genes, far fewer than had been expected before its sequencing. In fact, only about 1.5% of the genome codes for proteins, while the rest consists of RNA genes, regulatory sequences, introns and (controversially) "junk" DNA.

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