Glycemic variability affects mood and quality of life

May 10, 2012
Glycemic variability affects mood and quality of life

(HealthDay) -- Glycemic variability appears to be associated with lower quality of life and negative moods in women with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the March 30 issue of Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics.

Sue Penckofer, Ph.D., R.N., of Loyola University Chicago in Maywood, Ill., and colleagues conducted a descriptive, exploratory study involving 23 women with who wore continuous monitors for 72 hours to determine what, if any, impact glycemic variability may have on mood and . Measurements included mood and quality of life questionnaires; glycemic control (glycated hemoglobin and 24-hour mean glucose); and glycemic variability (24-hour standard deviation of the glucose readings, continuous overall net glycemic action, and the rate of change defined as "energy").

The researchers found that, compared with women without depression, those with and comorbid depression had higher anxiety, more anger, and reduced quality of life. After adjusting for age and weight, glycemic variability measures were significantly associated with health-related quality of life. Energy components correlated significantly with depression, trait anxiety, and overall quality of life. High anxiety was associated with steeper glucose excursions.

"The importance of these findings is that anxiety and depression may impact on diabetes self-care behaviors and quality of life, and glycemic variability may be a factor associated with these outcomes," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to Glucose Harmonics.

Explore further: Is there a link between mood and glucose control in diabetes?

More information: Full Text
Editorial

Related Stories

Is there a link between mood and glucose control in diabetes?

May 2, 2012
When blood sugar levels in diabetes are poorly controlled, patients tend to have more complications such as depression and other mood disturbances, including anxiety and anger, and a lower overall quality of life. A better ...

Study assesses glucose monitoring trends in tweens

April 12, 2012
(HealthDay) -- During the transition to adolescence, children with type 1 diabetes monitor their blood glucose less frequently, resulting in significant increases in HbA1c levels, according to research published online April ...

Nonsupportive family members sabotage diabetes self-Care

May 2, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Diabetes patients with nonsupportive family members are less adherent to their diabetes medication regimen and have worse glycemic control, according to a study published online April 26 in Diabetes Care.

Isomaltulose doesn't improve glycemic control in diabetes

April 13, 2012
(HealthDay) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, substitution of sucrose with isomaltulose is not associated with improved glycemic control (measured by hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] levels) at 12 weeks, according to a study published ...

Recommended for you

Smart mat detects early warning signs of foot ulcers

August 16, 2017
While completing his residency in anesthesiology at Massachusetts General Hospital in the mid-2000s, Jon Bloom saw his fair share of foot amputations among patients with diabetes. The culprit: infected foot ulcers.

The best place to treat type 1 diabetes might be just under your skin

August 14, 2017
A group of U of T researchers have demonstrated that the space under our skin might be an optimal location to treat type 1 diabetes (T1D).

New measure of insulin-making cells could gauge diabetes progression, treatment

August 10, 2017
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a new measurement for the volume and activity of beta cells, the source of the sugar-regulating hormone insulin.

Pioneering immunotherapy shows promise in type 1 diabetes

August 9, 2017
It may be possible to 'retrain' the immune system to slow the progression of type 1 diabetes, according to results of a clinical trial published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Online team-based game helps patients with diabetes lower blood glucose

August 8, 2017
Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System have found that an online, team-based game designed to teach patients about diabetes self-management had a sustained and meaningful ...

Oxidative stress biomarkers don't always signal diabetes risk

August 7, 2017
High levels of compounds found in the body that are commonly associated with oxidative damage may actually be a good sign for some people, according to a recent review of multiple human studies led by an epidemiologist at ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.