Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Sleep-disordered breathing tied to brain changes

(HealthDay)—Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is associated with changes in the brain, including amyloid deposition in brain regions typically involved in Alzheimer disease, according to a study published online March 23 ...

Diabetes

Tool aids safe fasting for T2DM patients observing Ramadan

(HealthDay)—Use of the Fasting Algorithm for Singaporeans with Type 2 Diabetes (FAST) facilitates safe intermittent fasting for patients with diabetes during Ramadan, according to a study published in the March/April issue ...

Medical research

Glucose acts as a double edged sword on longevity factor SIRT1

Feeding and fasting cycles exert control over metabolism and energy utilization. Aberrations are known to cause metabolic diseases, liver dysfunctions and accelerated aging. Expression and activity of the anti-aging factor ...

Neuroscience

The origin of satiety: Brain cells that change shape after a meal

Researchers from the CNRS, Inrae, University of Burgundy, Université de Paris, Inserm, and University of Luxembourg have just revealed the mechanisms in the brain that lead to feelings of satiety after eating. They involve ...

Diabetes

Getting off of the blood sugar roller coaster

For the 250,000 Canadians living with type 1 diabetes, the days of desperately trying to keep their blood sugar stable are coming to an end. A team of researchers at McGill University's Faculty of Medicine is working to optimize ...

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Glucose

Glucose (Glc), a monosaccharide (or simple sugar) also known as grape sugar, blood sugar, or corn sugar, is a very important carbohydrate in biology. The living cell uses it as a source of energy and metabolic intermediate. Glucose is one of the main products of photosynthesis and starts cellular respiration in both prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) and eukaryotes (animals, plants, fungi, and protists).

The name "glucose" comes from the Greek word glukus (γλυκύς), meaning "sweet", and the suffix "-ose," which denotes a sugar.

Two stereoisomers of the aldohexose sugars are known as glucose, only one of which (D-glucose) is biologically active. This form (D-glucose) is often referred to as dextrose monohydrate, or, especially in the food industry, simply dextrose (from dextrorotatory glucose). This article deals with the D-form of glucose. The mirror-image of the molecule, L-glucose, cannot be metabolized by cells in the biochemical process known as glycolysis.

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