Most people brush their teeth in the wrong way

May 15, 2012, University of Gothenburg

Almost all Swedes brush their teeth, yet only one in ten does it in a way that effectively prevents tooth decay. Now researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, are eager to teach Swedes how to brush their teeth more effectively.

Most Swedes regularly brush their with . But only few know the best brushing technique, how the toothpaste should be used and how fluoride prevents .

In two separate studies, Pia Gabre and her colleagues at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, studied the toothbrushing habits of 2013 Swedes aged 15-16, 31-35, 60-65 and 76-80 – how often and for how long, how often fluoride toothpaste is used, how much toothpaste is put on the toothbrush and how much water is used during and after the toothbrushing.

The results show that only ten percent of the population use toothpaste in the most effective way.

'Swedes generally do brush their teeth, but mostly because of social norms and to feel fresh rather than to prevent tooth decay,' says Gabre.

could improve their oral health considerably by learning how to maximise the effect of fluoride toothpaste, according to Gabre.

Nevertheless, the study shows that 80 percent are generally happy with how they take care of their teeth.

'Most of the interviewed subjects learned to brush their teeth as children, by their parents. Even if they have been informed about more effective techniques later in life, they continue to brush their teeth like they always have,' says Gabre.

The researchers conclude that Swedes' knowledge about toothbrushing must be improved and that the provided advice must be made simpler, clearer and more easy to use.

Explore further: New 'massage method' quadruples protection against tooth decay

More information: Link to the article: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22372308

Related Stories

New 'massage method' quadruples protection against tooth decay

March 26, 2012
Do you really want to avoid cavities in your teeth? Try massaging them with a high-fluoride toothpaste after lunch.

Recommended for you

Team provides insight into glucagon's role in diabetic heart disease

February 21, 2018
A UT Southwestern study reveals the hormone glucagon's importance to the development of insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction during Type 2 diabetes, presenting opportunities to develop new therapies for diabetic diseases ...

Physical exercise reduces risk of developing diabetes: study

February 20, 2018
Exercising more reduces the risk of diabetes and could see seven million fewer diabetic patients across mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, according to new research.

Some viruses produce insulin-like hormones that can stimulate human cells—and have potential to cause disease

February 19, 2018
Every cell in your body responds to the hormone insulin, and if that process starts to fail, you get diabetes. In an unexpected finding, scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center have identified four viruses that can produce insulin-like ...

Researchers discover link between gut and type 1 diabetes

February 19, 2018
Scientists have found that targeting micro-organisms in the gut, known as microbiota, could have the potential to help prevent type 1 diabetes.

Researchers find existing drug effective at preventing onset of type 1 diabetes

February 15, 2018
A drug commonly used to control high blood pressure may also help prevent the onset of type 1 diabetes in up to 60 percent of those at risk for the disease, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz ...

Chemist designs diabetic treatment minus harmful side effects

February 9, 2018
A chemist in the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S) has figured out how to control glucose levels in the bloodstream without the usual side effects of nausea, vomiting or malaise.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.