Study finds delayed side effects of head and neck cancer treatments go unreported

May 31, 2012

New data from an Internet-based study show that patients with head and neck cancers (HNC) may be at risk for significant late effects after their treatment, but they're unlikely to discuss these and other survivorship care issues with their doctors. The findings, from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, will be presented Monday, June 4, at the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago. The research team says the study reinforces the need to improve survivorship care for patients as they complete their active treatment, better educate patients about late effects they may experience, and encourage them to report these problems to their healthcare providers so they can be addressed.

Data from nearly 4,000 cancer survivors were gathered between April 2010 and October 2011 via patients who completed LIVESTRONG Care Plans via OncoLink, Penn Medicine's online cancer resource. Approximately four percent of those patients had been treated for a primary head or . Of those, nearly 88 percent reported having undergone radiation, 73 percent surgery, and 67 percent . Many patients reported late effects such as difficulty swallowing/speaking (83 percent), decreased saliva production (88 percent), problems (33 percent), decreased neck mobility (60 percent), concerns regarding cognitive function (53 percent), or vision deficits. However, since results show that patients only discuss the survivorship care plans they created on the site with their in 55 percent of cases, the researchers are concerned that many of these symptoms are not being reported or treated. The most common reasons for patients not sharing their survivorship care plans with healthcare providers were, "I did not think they would care," and "I did not want to upset or them."

"The fact that only about half of patients who create care plans are discussing them with indicates a need for further development of patient counseling and survivorship care so we can deliver higher quality care to cancer survivors of all kinds," says lead author Christine E. Hill-Kayser, MD, an assistant professor of in the Perelman School of Medicine. "Our study indicates that as many as 45 percent of these late effects are going unreported, so it's possible that HNC patients may be at a higher risk for post-treatment side effects than we thought. But without understanding the true incidence of these problems, we can't properly screen for these problems or intervene to help patients when they develop them."

Patient-reported data were gathered from HNC survivors voluntarily using the LIVESTRONG Care Plan, a free Internet-based tool used to create survivorship care plans. The tool, available at www.livestrongcareplan.com and through the OncoLink website, allows survivors to enter data regarding diagnosis, demographics, and treatments, and provides customized guidelines for future care and screening. Using this tool, HNC survivors were asked about any late effects they experienced following specific treatments. The authors say data reported in the new study may help shape future studies examining outcomes after HNC treatments, as well as patient counseling and survivor care plans.

Penn's Living Well After Cancer (LWAC) Program, for adult and childhood , is a LIVESTRONG Survivorship Center of Excellence. This designation, awarded by the Lance Armstrong Foundation, reflects excellence in clinical care, research and education. Within the LWAC Program, the same nurse practitioners who care for patients during their diagnosis and treatment help them develop an individualized survivorship care plan at the end of their treatment that guides patients if and when they transition back to their primary care or specialty provider for follow-up care.

"There's a very clear lack of communication between patients, oncologists and primary care physicians, which can ultimately have a major impact on our patients' long-term health and well-being, particularly if they are experiencing significant late effects of treatment," said Hill. "It's vital to our patients' long-term survival and our ability to provide guidance to them that physicians better educate patients about what they might experience following treatment and encourage patients to raise any concerns or health issues they experience."

Explore further: Study: Doctors differ in how best to care for America's 12 million cancer survivors

More information: Hill-Kayser will present the findings (Abstract #6135) between 1:15 and 5:15 on Monday, June 4, in S Hall A2 at McCormick Place, 2301 S. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago.

Related Stories

Study: Doctors differ in how best to care for America's 12 million cancer survivors

July 25, 2011
There are major differences between oncologists and primary care physicians regarding knowledge, attitudes, and practices required to care for American's 12 million cancer survivors. That is the key finding of the first ...

Many primary care docs don't know long-term effects of chemo: survey

May 17, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Many primary care doctors don't know the long-term side effects of the chemotherapy treatments that cancer survivors under their care may have been given, a new survey found.

Fox Chase Cancer Center leads efforts to establish national standards for survivorship care

March 19, 2012
People are living longer with and after a cancer diagnosis, making survivorship clinics and programs—as well as official guidelines and practices governing the care of survivors—an important emerging component of ...

Recommended for you

Study suggests colon cancer cells carry bacteria with them when they metastasize

November 24, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers working at Harvard University has found evidence that suggests a certain type of bacteria found in colon cancer tumors makes its way to tumors in other body parts by traveling with ...

Promising new treatment for rare pregnancy cancer leads to remission in patients

November 24, 2017
An immunotherapy drug can be used to cure women of a rare type of cancer arising from pregnancy when existing treatments have failed.

Researchers unravel novel mechanism by which tumors grow resistant to radiotherapy

November 23, 2017
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a key mechanism by which tumors develop resistance to radiation therapy and shown how such resistance might be overcome with drugs that are currently under development. The discovery ...

African Americans face highest risk for multiple myeloma yet underrepresented in research

November 23, 2017
Though African-American men are three times more likely to be diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer, most scientific research on the disease has been based on people of European descent, according to a study ...

Encouraging oxygen's assault on iron may offer new way to kill lung cancer cells

November 22, 2017
Blocking the action of a key protein frees oxygen to damage iron-dependent proteins in lung and breast cancer cells, slowing their growth and making them easier to kill. This is the implication of a study led by researchers ...

One in four U.S. seniors with cancer has had it before

November 22, 2017
(HealthDay)—For a quarter of American seniors, a cancer diagnosis signals the return of an old foe, new research shows.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.