Microbiome analysis helps understand cause of chronic sinus condition, suggests cure

June 18, 2012, American Society for Microbiology

A study of the microbiome of the human nose provides clues to the cause of a chronic sinus condition and potential strategy for a cure. Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco report their findings today at the 2012 General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is characterized by inflammation of the nasal and paranasal sinuses lasting over 12 weeks. Patients suffering from this disease experience a variety of symptoms including congestion, fatigue, and even depression and it can lead to other conditions such as asthma, meningitis and . Annually, it is estimated to be responsible for as many as 22 million office visits and more than 500,000 emergency department visits in the U.S. with reaching as high as $3.5 billion. The causes of are not completely understood. This has hampered development of long-lasting, definitive treatments.

"With the fast-growing body of literature that demonstrates associations between the human microbiome composition and several diseases such as asthma and obesity, we hypothesized that a nasal microbiome exists and plays a role in CRS development," says Nabeetha Nagalingam, a researcher on the study.

In the study Nagalingam and colleagues compared the nasal microbial communities of 10 CRS patients and 10 healthy individuals. They found that patients with CRS had a depleted nasal microbiome, characterized by a significant reduction in and an overgrowth of one type of bacteria, Corynebacterium spp.

"We investigated our hypothesis that C. tuberculostearicum in the setting of a depleted microbiome can induce pathophysiology consistent with sinusitis using a ," says Nagalingam.

To recreate a depleted microbiome, mice were administered antibiotics for 7 days before they were infected with C. tuberculostearicum. Mice who were given the antibiotic before exposure displayed symptoms of sinusitis. Mice that were not first treated with antibiotics but exposed to the bacteria did not.

"From our human microbiome comparative profiling, we noted that lactic acid bacteria, including Lactobacillus sakei, were significantly depleted in patients with CRS and postulated that this bacterium may have a protective role against CRS development," says Nagalingam. Once again using the mouse model they showed that L. sakei inhibited the growth of C. tuberculostearicum and could prevent infection, even with a depleted nasal microbiome.

"These findings suggest that manipulation of to restore colonization by beneficial species identified in this study may represent a novel and efficacious approach for prevention or management of CRS," says Nagalingam.

Explore further: IL-32 expression upregulated in chronic rhinosinusitis

More information: This research was presented as part of the 2012 General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology held June 16-19, 2012 in San Francisco, California.

Related Stories

IL-32 expression upregulated in chronic rhinosinusitis

April 17, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Interleukin-32 (IL-32) mRNA expression is significantly higher in biopsies obtained from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), compared to levels found in biopsies obtained from individuals without the ...

Recommended for you

Don't hold your nose and close your mouth when you sneeze, doctors warn

January 15, 2018
Pinching your nose while clamping your mouth shut to contain a forceful sneeze isn't a good idea, warn doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs

January 12, 2018
Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world—creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines—and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant ...

Dengue takes low and slow approach to replication

January 11, 2018
A new study reveals how dengue virus manages to reproduce itself in an infected person without triggering the body's normal defenses. Duke researchers report that dengue pulls off this hoax by co-opting a specialized structure ...

Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responses

January 11, 2018
Genetic differences between different strains of the same pathogenic bacterial species appear to result in widely varying immune system responses, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.

Human protein may aid neuron invasion by virus that causes hand, foot, and mouth disease

January 11, 2018
A human protein known as prohibitin may play a significant role in infection of the nervous system by EV71, one of several viruses that can cause hand, foot, and mouth disease. Issac Too of the National University of Singapore ...

Untangling how Epstein-Barr virus infects cells

January 11, 2018
A team led by scientists at Northwestern Medicine has discovered a new epithelial receptor for Epstein-Barr virus, according to a study published recently in Nature Microbiology.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.