Periodontitis linked to HPV-positive head, neck tumors

June 20, 2012
Periodontitis linked to HPV-Positive head, neck tumors
For patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma there is an increased risk of human papillomavirus-positive tumors among those with a history of periodontitis, according to a study published online June 18 in the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

(HealthDay) -- For patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) there is an increased risk of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive tumors among those with a history of periodontitis, according to a study published online June 18 in the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Mine Tezal, D.D.S., Ph.D., from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and colleagues evaluated dental records and tissue samples from 124 patients over the age of 21 years diagnosed with incident primary (SCC) of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and larynx between 1999 and 2007. Alveolar bone loss measured from panoramic radiographs was used to assess history, and the correlation between periodontitis and HPV status of HNSCC was evaluated.

The researchers found that the prevalence of HPV-positive HNSCC was 40.3 percent, with a higher proportion of oropharyngeal cancers HPV positive compared with oral cavity and laryngeal cancers (65.3 versus 29.0 and 20.5 percent, respectively). The odds of HPV-positive tumor status increased with each millimeter of alveolar bone loss (odds ratio [OR], 2.61), even after adjustment for age at diagnosis, sex, and smoking status. The odds of HPV-positive tumor status were greater among patients with oropharyngeal SCC (OR, 11.70), compared to those with oral cavity SCC (OR, 2.32; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.65 to 8.27) and laryngeal SCC (OR, 3.89; 95 percent CI, 0.95 to 15.99).

"A history of chronic inflammatory disease in the oral cavity may be associated with tumor HPV status in patients with HNSCC," the authors write.

Explore further: Study examines chronic inflammation in oral cavity and HPV status of head and neck cancers

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Study examines chronic inflammation in oral cavity and HPV status of head and neck cancers

June 18, 2012
Among patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, a history of chronic inflammation in the mouth (periodontitis, i.e. gum disease) may be associated with an increased risk of tumors positive for human papillomavirus ...

Gender, insurance type tied to HPV infection in laryngeal cancer patients

September 14, 2011
The human papillomavirus (HPV) is more likely to be found in tumors of laryngeal cancer patients who are male and those with private health insurance, according to a new study from researchers at Henry Ford Hospital.

Oral HPV infection, HPV-related cancers more common in men

January 26, 2012
Oral HPV infection is more common among men than women, explaining why men are more prone than women to develop an HPV related head and neck cancer, according to a study presented at the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer ...

Recommended for you

Fully reprogrammed virus offers new hope as cancer treatment

May 25, 2018
A cancer treatment that can completely destroy cancer cells without affecting healthy cells could soon be a possibility, thanks to research led by Cardiff University.

Research could help fine-tune cancer treatment

May 25, 2018
Cancer therapies that cut off blood supply to a tumour could be more effective in combination with existing chemotherapeutic drugs—according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Increasing physical activity linked to better immunity in breast cancer patients, study finds

May 25, 2018
A new study from the University of Toronto's Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education has found that moderate to vigorous physical activity may help regulate the levels of C-reactive protein – an important biomarker ...

Low-fat diet tied to better breast cancer survival

May 24, 2018
(HealthDay)—Breast cancer patients who adopted a low-fat diet were more likely to survive for at least a decade after diagnosis, compared to patients who ate fattier fare, new research shows.

A cascade of immune processes offers insights to triple-negative breast cancer

May 24, 2018
Cancer is crafty. To survive and thrive, tumors find a way of thwarting our body's natural systems.

By forming clots in tumors, immune cell aids lung cancer's spread

May 24, 2018
University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have found that by helping to form clots within tumors, immune cells that flock to a particular type of lung cancer are actually building a foundation ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.