Bladder control an issue for young women

July 17, 2012

(Medical Xpress) -- Traditionally considered an older women’s condition, urinary incontinence (UI) affects one in eight healthy young women, causing depression in some, ‎according to a new study.

Published today in high impact journal, the Annals of Internal Medicine, the study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of UI, risk factors, and effect on quality of life in otherwise healthy young women aged 16 to 30 years. The study is the first of its kind to look at incontinence in young women who have never experienced a pregnancy. Pregnancy is a known contributor to UI.

Monash University honours student Tessa O’Halloran, together with Professors Susan Davis and Robin Bell, from the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, surveyed 1000 healthy young women and found 12.6 per cent of the women had UI.

Professor Davis said the extent to which UI affects younger women who have never been pregnant had not been well understood until now.

“An embarrassing problem, UI is actually very common, affecting around 40 per cent of Australian women, but is usually attributed to having been pregnant, obesity or ageing,” Professor Davis said.

“Our study is the first to look at incontinence in young women who have never experienced a pregnancy. We found that one in eight young women are vulnerable to incontinence irrespective of common risk factors such as pregnancy or obesity.

Professor Davis said symptoms of UI interfered with everyday functioning and wellbeing, with half of the women reporting they worried about odour and restricted their fluid intake.

“We also found that UI for can have adverse effects on behaviour and general wellbeing. Women experiencing incontinence had lower wellbeing, greater levels of anxiety and were more likely to have a depressed mood,” Professor Davis said.

The study found sexually active women were more likely to report incontinence and, of this group, the likelihood of incontinence was halved for those who used the oral contraceptive pill.

Explore further: Regaining control: new study sheds light on incontinence

Related Stories

Regaining control: new study sheds light on incontinence

September 5, 2011
An Australian study has revealed that as many as one in eight healthy young women have urinary incontinence (UI).

Incontinence 20 years after child birth three times more common after vaginal delivery

March 26, 2012
Women are nearly three times more likely to experience urinary incontinence for more than 10 years following a vaginal delivery rather than a caesarean section, finds new research at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University ...

PTSD linked to urinary incontinence in female veterans

June 1, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is independently associated with urgency/mixed urinary incontinence (UI) symptoms in female veterans, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal ...

Drug treatment for urinary incontinence effective, but side-effects can derail success

April 9, 2012
Women with UI suffer physical, psychological, and social consequences of not being in full control of their bladders.

International study shows Caesareans not as 'posh' as commonly believed

June 14, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- A ground-breaking study of women who have given birth in New Zealand, Scotland and England, has found the strongest evidence yet that having caesarean sections does not always protect women from the common ...

Recommended for you

Faulty gene linked to obesity in adults

August 18, 2017
Groundbreaking new research linking obesity and metabolic dysfunction to a problem in the energy generators in cells has been published by researchers from the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research and The University ...

Two lung diseases killed 3.6 million in 2015: study

August 17, 2017
The two most common chronic lung diseases claimed 3.6 million lives worldwide in 2015, according to a tally published Thursday in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

New test differentiates between Lyme disease, similar illness

August 16, 2017
Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne illness in the United States. But it can be confused with similar conditions, including Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness. A team of researchers led by Colorado ...

Addressing superbug resistance with phage therapy

August 16, 2017
International research involving a Monash biologist shows that bacteriophage therapy – a process whereby bacterial viruses attack and destroy specific strains of bacteria - can be used successfully to treat systemic, multidrug ...

Can previous exposure to west Nile alter the course of Zika?

August 15, 2017
West Nile virus is no stranger to the U.S.-Mexico border; thousands of people in the region have contracted the mosquito-borne virus in the past. But could this previous exposure affect how intensely Zika sickens someone ...

Compounds in desert creosote bush could treat giardia and 'brain-eating' amoeba infections

August 15, 2017
Researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California San Diego and the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that compounds produced by the creosote bush, a ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.