Cognitive behavioral therapy helps nurses manage stress

July 31, 2012
Cognitive behavioral therapy helps nurses manage stress
A once-weekly cognitive behavioral intervention significantly reduces nurses' occupational stress and fatigue and increases vigor, according to research published in the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

(HealthDay) -- A once-weekly cognitive behavioral intervention (CBI) significantly reduces nurses' occupational stress and fatigue and increases vigor, according to research published in the August issue of Applied Nursing Research.

Sarid Orly, Ph.D., of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beer-Sheva, Israel, and colleagues conducted a study involving 20 who participated in a CBI course and 16 control nurses matched by age, education, marital status, and hospital department. The authors sought to evaluate the impact of CBI on nurses' occupational stress and overall well-being, specifically their sense of (SOC), perceived stress (PSS), and mood states.

The researchers found that the 64-hour course, conducted in four-hour increments once per week, yielded significant increases in participants' SOC and vigor when compared with that of control nurses who did not participate in the CBI. PSS and fatigue were also significantly reduced.

"The present study investigated the effects of CBI group intervention upon nurses' perceived SOC, PSS, and mood states in comparison with a ," the authors write. "Results showed that only nurses who had participated in the CBI course had higher SOC, more vigor, less PSS, and less fatigue upon completion of the study."

Explore further: Occupational exposures put nurses at risk of miscarriage

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Occupational exposures put nurses at risk of miscarriage

April 11, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Nurses face an increased risk of spontaneous abortions during early pregnancy from occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs and sterilizing agents, according to a study published in the April issue of ...

Calling nurses to exercise as role models for their patients

August 30, 2011
Nurses, just like many of their patients, struggle to find time and motivation to exercise. But a new study may give these all-important caregivers some additional pressure and responsibility: nurses' attitudes can influence ...

Recommended for you

Cultural values can be a strong predictor of alcohol consumption

November 20, 2017
Countries with populations that value autonomy and harmony tend to have higher average levels of alcohol consumption than countries with more traditional values, such as hierarchy and being part of a collective. This new ...

A walk at the mall or the park? New study shows, for moms and daughters, a walk in the park is best

November 17, 2017
Spending time together with family may help strengthen the family bond, but new research from the University of Illinois shows that specifically spending time outside in nature—even just a 20-minute walk—together can ...

Risk of distracted driving predicted by age, gender, personality and driving frequency

November 17, 2017
New research identifies age, gender, personality and how often people drive as potential risk factors for becoming distracted while driving. Young men, extroverted or neurotic people, and people who drive more often were ...

When male voles drink alcohol, but their partner doesn't, their relationship suffers

November 17, 2017
A study of the effect of alcohol on long-term relationships finds that when a male prairie vole has access to alcohol, but his female partner doesn't, the relationship suffers - similar to what has been observed in human ...

Spanking linked to increase in children's behavior problems

November 16, 2017
Children who have been spanked by their parents by age 5 show an increase in behavior problems at age 6 and age 8 relative to children who have never been spanked, according to new findings in Psychological Science, a journal ...

Multiplayer video games: Researchers discover link between skill and intelligence

November 15, 2017
Researchers at the University of York have discovered a link between young people's ability to perform well at two popular video games and high levels of intelligence.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.