Role of annual well-woman assessment reviewed

July 24, 2012
Role of annual well-woman assessment reviewed
For women, an annual assessment is an important part of medical care and should include screening, evaluation, and counseling, according to a Committee Opinion published online July 23 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

(HealthDay) -- For women, an annual assessment is an important part of medical care and should include screening, evaluation, and counseling, according to a Committee Opinion published online July 23 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

The Committee on Gynecologic Practice of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, based in Washington D.C., reviewed the role of an annual health assessment in women's medical care.

The researchers note that the annual health assessment represents a fundamental part of and is important for promotion of preventive practices, recognizing risk factors for disease, identifying medical problems, and establishing a relationship between the clinician and patient. The annual health assessment should include screening, assessments, and counseling, as well as immunizations, when necessary, based on age and risk factors. A key element of the health assessment is the physical examination, with components that may vary based on the patient's age, , and physician preference. The committee recommends that, regardless of sexual activity, speculum examinations for cervical cancer should begin at age 21 years; pelvic examinations should always be conducted in patients who report or exhibit symptoms suggestive of female genital tract, pelvic, urologic, or rectal problems; annual examinations may be modified for asymptomatic patients, without complicating medical issues, who have undergone a total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for benign indications; breast self-awareness should be encouraged; and clinical breast examinations should be performed annually in women aged 40 years or older and every one to three years for those aged 20 to 39 years. The decision to perform any pelvic or breast examination should be made with the consent of the patient.

"An annual visit provides an excellent opportunity to counsel patients about maintaining a healthy lifestyle and minimizing health risks," the authors write.

Explore further: Updated policy about consent for pelvic exams in Canada needs revision

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Updated policy about consent for pelvic exams in Canada needs revision

March 26, 2012
An updated policy guiding pelvic examinations of women under anesthetic in Canada has created a gap in terms of consent, states an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

OB/GYN screening may help detect heart disease risk

March 26, 2012
Simple screening implemented in obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) clinics may identify previously undetected heart disease risk among women and has the potential to greatly increase education about prevention and treatment ...

ACR, SBI support updated ACOG recommendations that women begin annual mammograms at age 40

July 20, 2011
The American College of Radiology (ACR) and Society of Breast Imaging applaud and support updated American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' (ACOG) recommendations that women begin getting annual mammograms at age ...

MRI screening for women with a family history of breast cancer but no genetic predisposition

March 21, 2012
Adding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to standard breast cancer screening approaches is expensive, though it could be cost effective for a group of women who may not have inherited the breast cancer susceptibility genes, ...

Recommended services not always given during patients' annual exams

January 18, 2012
New research finds that patients may not always receive all of the screening tests and counseling services that are due during their medical checkups.

Recommended for you

Womb natural killer cell discovery could lead to screening for miscarriage risk

December 14, 2017
For the first time the functions of natural killer cells in the womb have been identified.

Hormone discovery marks breakthough in understanding fertility

December 12, 2017
Scientists at The University of Nottingham have shown, for the first time, that a naturally occurring hormone plays a vital part in regulating a woman's fertility, a discovery that could lead to better diagnosis and treatment ...

Study reveals Viagra to be 'ineffective' for fetal growth restriction

December 8, 2017
A University of Liverpool led international clinical trial has found an anti-impotence drug to be ineffective at improving outcomes for pregnancies complicated by fetal growth restriction.

Obese first-time mums more likely to have premature babies

December 4, 2017
Obese women are up to three times more likely to have a premature child during their first pregnancy, according to a study from University College Dublin.

Stillbirth is not just stillbirth—more information is needed

December 4, 2017
Forty two babies are stillborn in Australia every week, and 60 per cent of them are recorded as "unexplained".

First baby from a uterus transplant in the US born in Dallas

December 2, 2017
The first birth as a result of a womb transplant in the United States has occurred in Texas, a milestone for the U.S. but one achieved several years ago in Sweden.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.