Argentina's miracle morgue baby now 4 months old

August 9, 2012

(AP) — Argentina's miracle morgue baby is now four months old and closer to home.

Luz Milagros Veron — the name means "Miracle Light" in English — was flown with her mother Analia Bouter on Thursday to a pediatric hospital closer to her home in provincial Chaco after months in intensive care in Buenos Aires.

Doctors said the baby showed no signs of life when she was born three months premature in April, and quickly sent her to the morgue. She's alive today because her parents insisted on seeing her body to say goodbye. After 12 hours inside a sealed coffin, she moved and let out a tiny cry. She was cold as ice, but far from dead.

Since then, Luz Milagros has grown and become stronger, but she isn't ready to go home yet.

Hugo Ramos, the deputy director of the hospital in provincial Resistencia where she will now be cared for, said she suffered neurological damage, still has internal bleeding and remains on a respirator. She's in stable but very serious condition, Ramos said, according to Argentina's Diarios y Noticias news agency.

Bouter acknowledged the challenges but expressed hope her daughter would improve enough to take her home. "In the future we'll see how to prepare the house to receive her," she said.

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alfie_null
not rated yet Aug 10, 2012
How many times have events not quite played out the same?
Need more reliable diagnostics to detect life.

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