Factors tied to photoprotection ID'd for organ recipients

August 21, 2012
Factors tied to photoprotection ID'd for organ recipients
For organ transplant recipients, patients factors, including sex and skin type, and receipt of advice from health care providers, are both associated with sun protective behaviors, according to a study published online Aug. 9 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

(HealthDay) -- For organ transplant recipients, patients factors, including sex and skin type, and receipt of advice from health care providers, are both associated with sun protective behaviors, according to a study published online Aug. 9 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Noting that are at increased risk of non-melanoma skin cancers, Eva Mihalis, of Harvard University in Boston, and associates examined the patient and health care factors associated with sun protective behaviors in organ transplant recipients. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional, retrospective survey of 198 U.S. organ recipients, from 2004 to 2008, without prior diagnosis of skin cancer.

The researchers observed a significant increase in overall use of sunscreen after transplantation. In multivariable models, the frequency of post-transplant sunscreen use correlated significantly with sex, Fitzpatrick skin type, pre-transplant use, and receiving advice to avoid sun from a health care provider. Post-transplant sun avoidance correlated significantly with pre-transplantation sun exposure, advice to avoid sun, and pre-transplant sunscreen use.

"Both patient features and clinician advice are associated with sun protective behaviors after ," the authors write. "These results help physicians target expanded sun protection counseling to those patients most in need of such intervention."

Explore further: HPV infection highly prevalent among organ transplant recipients

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Heart transplant patients at risk for serious skin cancers

June 30, 2011

A new study published in the American Journal of Transplantation reveals that there is a significant risk of serious skin cancers, including cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, in heart transplant patients.

Recommended for you

3-D bioprinted human cartilage cells can be implanted

March 23, 2017

Swedish researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy and Chalmers University of Technology have successfully induced human cartilage cells to live and grow in an animal model, using 3-D bioprinting. The results will move development ...

MRI-powered mini-robots could offer targeted treatment

March 7, 2017

Invasive surgical techniques - cutting through the breastbone for open heart surgery or making a large incision to inspect an abdominal tumor - allow physicians to effectively treat disease but can lead to sometimes serious ...

New method rescues donor organs to save lives

March 6, 2017

A multidisciplinary team led by Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, Mikati Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Sciences at Columbia Engineering, and Matt Bacchetta, associate professor of surgery at Columbia ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.